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Archive for May, 2010

by: Bsomich
30  May  2010

Weekly IM Update.

 
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This Week’s Food for Thought:

8 Ways to Balance Collaboration Efforts with Traditional Records Management

If you’re like most companies these days, you’re in the midst of deploying collaboration tools, such as SharePoint, in an attempt to meet users demands for more open communications.  At the same time, you’re probably maintaining an array of legacy records management systems, deployed a decade or more ago, which are used to manage a specific subset of data in a very specific way.  If you haven’t already noticed, these systems are like oil and water. To provide some guidance on how to balance the conflicting goals of collaboration and records management, I offer the following considerations.

Read the complete post.

Phil Simon: MIKE2.0 Featured Blogger 

I’m very pleased to be joining Mike 2.0 as a featured contributor. Considering that I’ve written two books, maintain my own blog, and write for a number of other technology sites and publications, it’s safe to say that I have no shortage of opinions on different technology, data, BI, and management issues–the very topics that Mike 2.0 addresses. In other words, based on what I have seen and continue to see as a consultant, it won’t be hard for me to write a weekly post that I hope you find interesting.

OK, enough with the introductions. This week I was reminded about the reasons that the future of open source software is so promising. To be sure, I’ve got OS religion.

So, why am I so bullish on OS? Well, many reasons that will become apparent as you read my posts each week. Allow me to start off with a story from this past week..

Read complete post. Social Software Gaining Traction in the Enterprise 

Forrester’s Rob Koplowitz writes that 2010 will be a defining year for enterprise 2.0 in his report, Enterprise Social Networking 2010 Market Overview. He goes on the writes that “a very broad and rich landscape of technology vendors will differentiate to stay relevant in this crowded market. With enterprise social technologies, buyers must now assess vendors pursuing three distinct strategies: commoditization, horizontal and vertical solutions, and integration with adjacent technologies.”.

Read complete post.

 
 

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Mkbergman
27  May  2010

MIKE2.0 F2F at SemTech 2010

SemTech 2010There will be a face-to-face session on MIKE2.0 and its semantic enterprise offering at the upcoming Semantic Technology Conference 2010. This F2F session on MIKE2.0 will be at 4:45 PM – 5:45 PM on Thurs, June 24. The conference, which expects 1200 attendees or so, is in its sixth year and is being held at at the Hilton Union Square in downtown San Francisco on June 21-25, 2010.

I will be leading the session and offering a few introductory remarks and slides. After that, we are hoping for a lively discussion and Q&A session on MIKE2.0 and its applicability to information development projects. While the emphasis will be on the semantic enterprise, given the broad usefulness of MIKE2.0, all topics will be fair game!

If any MIKE2.0 aficionados or practitioners are in the area, please attend and contribute. And, if you just simply want to learn more and meet others using the methodology, please drop by and join in the discussion.

Hope to see you there!

Tags: ,
Category: MIKE2.0, Semantic Web
2 Comments »

by: Phil Simon
26  May  2010

Hello World

I’m very pleased to be joining Mike 2.0 as a featured contributor. Considering that I’ve written two books, maintain my own blog, and write for a number of other technology sites and publications, it’s safe to say that I have no shortage of opinions on different technology, data, BI, and management issues–the very topics that Mike 2.0 addresses. In other words, based on what I have seen and continue to see as a consultant, it won’t be hard for me to write a weekly post that I hope you find interesting.

OK, enough with the introductions. This week I was reminded about the reasons that the future of open source software is so promising. To be sure, I’ve got OS religion.

So, why am I so bullish on OS? Well, many reasons that will become apparent as you read my posts each week. Allow me to start off with a story from this past week.

Background

My new client (Acme Industries) runs a well-known ERP. (The name of the client and application aren’t really relevant for the purposes of this post). They had some challenges on a previous version of the app’s time and attendance (T&A) application but figured out ways to work around them. About four years ago, the vendor announced the eventual decommission date for the T&A app after introducing it in the mid 1990′s. Beset by current economic conditions, Acme was not in a position to spend $50,000 or so on the forced upgrade. Yet, faced with running an “unsupported” application, management finally agreed to make the plunge.

Last week I conducted training to Acme end users on the new application. They were justifiably curious about whether the vendor’s new app (call it Absence Management [AM]) would address the often manual process of managing employee vacation and sick balances. While AM’s automation trumps that of its predecessor, attendees in my class could not believe the amount of setup involved in AM to enable that automation. For example, to decrement employee balances, no fewer than nine steps are required in the new application. What’s worse, all of that setup still meant that retroactive changes will probably need to be calculated manually.

Ouch.

Now, I’m no newbie to the scene. I’ve been working with enterprise apps long enough (nearly 15 years) to know that no vendor is going to please everyone. I realize the following:

  • There is no such thing as perfect software.
  • Enterprise software is usually complicated to some degree because enterprises and government regulations mandate a certain level of complexity.
  • Some app changes are more visible to end users than others. Back-end changes to database schema, table indexes, or batch processing are often invisible to everyday folks. However, everybody notices changes to GUIs.
  • For every client that finds a new application or version cumbersome, there’s another that welcomes it with open arms. Translation: you’ll never make everyone happy.
  • It’s completely unreasonable to expect major software vendors to support antiquated versions of applications run by two percent of their client bases.

So, what did I tell Acme’s end users? I’m an independent technology consultant and can call a spade a spade. I agreed with Acme’s folks because, in my view, the squeeze of the upgrade probably wasn’t worth the juice. Of course, they really don’t have a choice.

My experience this week reminded me of this video on enterprise software vendors and their often questionable tactics:

Lessons

What does this little yarn say about open source? Quite a bit. Imagine a scenario in which organizations can decide if and when they want to upgrade. Imagine clients not being beholden to vendor decommission dates and threats of being unsupported. Imagine having the flexibility to adopt only desired features. Imagine not paying support on shelfware. Imagine actually achieving lower TCO in the process. Sound too good to be true? It isn’t.

Now, don’t get me wrong. Open source is no panacea and, I’d argue, it’s not right for every organization, every type of app, and every industry. But the days of OS exclusively as a tool for geeks in dark rooms have come to an end. As long as stories like Acme’s continue to proliferate, more people will realize this.

What do you think?

Tags:
Category: Enterprise2.0, Information Development
2 Comments »

by: Bsomich
26  May  2010

Getting Serious with Semantics

An open semantic enterprise is an organization that uses the languages and standards of the semantic Web, including RDF, RDFS, OWL, SPARQL and others to integrate existing information assets, using the best practices of linked data and the open world assumption, and targeting knowledge management applications. The natural scope of the open semantic enterprise is in knowledge management and representation. Suitable applications include data federation, data warehousing, search, enterprise information integration, business intelligence, competitive intelligence, knowledge representation, etc.

There are seven guiding principles for the open semantic enterprise:

  • RDF
  • Linked Data
  • Open World Mindset
  • Layered Approach
  • Web-oriented Architecture
  • Ontology-driven Apps
  • Adaptive Ontologies

Embracing these principles of the open semantic enterprise can bring these knowledge management benefits:

  • Domains can be analyzed and inspected incrementally
  • Schema can be incomplete and developed and refined incrementally
  • The data and the structures within these frameworks can be used and expressed in a piecemeal or incomplete manner
  • Data with partial characterizations can be combined with other data having complete characterizations
  • Systems built with these frameworks are flexible and robust; as new information or structure is gained, it can be incorporated without negating the information already resident, and
  • Both open and closed world subsystems can be bridged.

Moreover, by building on successful Web architectures, the enterprise can put in place loosely coupled, distributed systems that can grow and interoperate in a decentralized manner. The potential benefits can be summarized as greater insight with lower risk, lower cost, faster deployment, and more agile responsiveness.

We’re currently expanding this offering on MIKE2.0. Your feedback and suggestions are much appreciated.

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
24  May  2010

Profile Spotlight: Antoine Frangieh

Antoine Frangieh

Antoine is a Knowledge and Information Management expert with an emphasis on Data Quality, Business Intelligence and Content Management (Document and Record Management).

He also has a fair knowledge of IT systems and a sound knowledge of public sector procurement processes.

He has been involved in major European Commission DGs architecture definition and service evaluation, as well as an implementation of a data governance framework focused on Data Quality, and in a major data quality transformation and reporting processes definition and implementation at a private company.

Connect with Antoine

Category: Information Development, Member Profiles
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
21  May  2010

Weekly IM Update.

 
 
 Untitled-1.jpg

Foundational Solutions for the Enterprise 

Foundational Solutions are “background” solutions that support the Core Solution Offerings of the MIKE2.0 Methodology. Foundational Solutions include:

Some Foundational Solutions are also go-to-market offerings. These include:

Foundational Solutions are the lowest-level assets within MIKE2.0 that are comprehensive in nature. They may tie together multiple Supporting Assets and are referenced from the Overall Implementation Guide and other Solution Offerings. 

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community  

 
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This Week’s Food for Thought:

Ensuring Security with Master Data Management 

A master data management (MDM) system is a set of both tools and processes to help companies maintain a consistent record of their information. To experience the expected benefits MDM must be properly implemented, with security as a primary consideration.

At a basic level, information security is based on the triad of confidentiality, integrity and availability (CIA), reflecting the desirable characteristics of data within a secure and successful IT system.

Read the complete post.

How Solid is your Information Management System?

Solidity: (noun)  the state, property, or quality of being solid. having firmness and strength; substantialness.

An enterprise’s information system is the primary pillar and support system for the majority of its business operations, intelligence and day-to-day transactions.   Depending on the complexity of the organization and how quickly it operates, the ability to organize, analyze and effectively manage enterprise information becomes increasingly crucial to its success.   As an IM professional, you want to ensure that this system can withhold the pressure of these operations and managements ever-changing needs. 

Although most IM pros understand this challenge- they often don’t know how to overcome it.

Larry Dubov, senior director of business management consulting at IBM-owned Initiate Systems, writes a good post explaining how data hubs can work with SOA to increase solidity in your information management system.

Read complete post. Social Content Governance: Who Provides It?

The Enterprise Content Management (ECM) industry has gone through significant transformations over the course of the past decade.  A seminal event that got ECM on the mainstream map was the Enron debacle a few years ago, followed by Sarbanes Oxley, followed by Federal Rules of Civil Procedure changes that occurred in late 2008.

Read complete post.

 
 

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Category: Information Development
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by: Bsomich
20  May  2010

How solid is your information management system?

Solidity: (noun)  the state, property, or quality of being solid. having firmness and strength; substantialness.

An enterprise’s information system is the primary pillar and support system for the majority of its business operations, intelligence and day-to-day transactions.   Depending on the complexity of the organization and how quickly it operates, the ability to organize, analyze and effectively manage enterprise information becomes increasingly crucial to its success.   As an IM professional, you want to ensure that this system can withhold the pressure of these operations and managements ever-changing needs. 

Although most IM pros understand this challenge- they often don’t know how to overcome it.

Larry Dubov, senior director of business management consulting at IBM-owned Initiate Systems, writes a good post explaining how data hubs can work with SOA to increase solidity in your information management system:
The data hub as master data service (MDS) provides an ideal way for managing data within a service-oriented-architecture (SOA) environment. The MDS is the hub, and all systems communicate directly with it using SOA principles. Participating systems are ‘autonomous’ in SOA parlance, meaning that they can stay independent of one another and do not have to know the details of how other systems manage master data. This allows disparate system-specific schemas and internal business rules to be hidden, which greatly reduces tight coupling and the overall brittleness of the ecosystem.
This is great advice for service-oriented architectures, but what about other frameworks?  What advice can you offer complex organizations who don’t rely on SOA?

Category: Information Development
3 Comments »

by: Bsomich
18  May  2010

Profile Spotlight: Jon Asprey

Jon Asprey

Jon has over 12 years experience in information management and data analysis, where he has worked for both global consultancies and software vendors with many international clients.

Initially working within direct marketing operations, assisting clients to build a single customer view and optimise customer analytics, Jon developed a detailed understanding of managing disparate data systems.

Most recently, Jon has focused on data quality management and has advised clients to plan their data quality strategy and build business case justifications for data management initiatives such as Data Governance and MDM.

Jon has held senior consulting positions at both HP Consulting and Deloitte.

Connect with Jon.

Category: Information Development, Member Profiles
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
14  May  2010

Weekly IM Update.

 
 
 Untitled-1.jpg

Complimentary Tools and Techniques 

Our tools and techniques papers are methods that can be used to speed the implementation process.  They provide recommendations for solving a number of business problems for which information management is critical to success.

MIKE2.0 tools and techniques papers include:  

Feel free to check them out when you have a moment- your comments and contributions are much appreciated!

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community  

 
Contribute to MIKE:

Start a new article, help with articles under construction or look for other ways to contribute.

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This Week’s Food for Thought:

What Happens When Data Governance Turns Bureaucratic?

How Data Governance Police Can Constrain the Value of Your Multidomain Master Data Management Initiative

I published a white paper last year, entitled “When Data Governance Turns Bureaucratic,” that looked at how reactive data governance was preventing organizations from realizing the full value of master data management (MDM). By “reactive”, I mean organizations using a “coexistence” architecture where front office applications (CRM) and back office applications (ERP) are still used to author master data (customer and product data, suppliers, employees, etc.)…

Read the complete post.

Overcoming the Barriers to IM Success: Learn from the Past 

The total annual cost of worldwide IT failures is $6.2 trillion dollars- a staggering amount-  according to calculations performed by Roger Sessions, enterprise architect and CTO of ObjectWatch.  

How can organizations overcome these financially disastrous situations?

Firstly, it’s important to note that the term “failure” can have many implications, but for the sake of this post, let’s assume the general sense is that the solution in question fails to meet the needs of the organization.

Having learned by experience, these are the main reasons I’ve seen IT implementations fail (and how to avoid them)…

Read complete post. 6 Steps to a Smart Information Architecture Strategy

Mention “canonical information model” in some circles, and people will run screaming from the room. Memories of unending quests to map the corporate information model are still fresh for these IT pros, creating a post-traumatic-stress response. Is it any wonder that formal infrastructure architecture (IA) practices have had trouble getting off the ground?

Read complete post.

 
 

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Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Robert.hillard
14  May  2010

Templates for report development standards and architectures

Jason Sharpe (Telstra General Manager for Collaboration, Knowledge, and Intelligence) and I met this week to discuss an area that we both feel strongly about: the need for standards within and across organizations for the development of reports.  We think this isn’t really an area that any commercial business looks to use as a point of differentiation, rather it is a “ticket to play” for good information practice.

Jason and I are looking for collaborators to develop vendor-neutral reporting templates (building on the existing MIKE2.0 Deliverable Templates) which could then be extended to vendor-specific templates and cross referenced to the MIKE2.0 WBS.  By doing this within MIKE2.0, client organizations can effectively engage their vendors and service providers to finalize these documents for their specific needs which reduces the vendor’s cost of sale while improve the speed and quality of outcome for their clients.

Please let Jason and myself know if you are interested in taking part in this initiative.

Category: Enterprise Data Management, Information Management
2 Comments »

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