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Archive for December, 2010

by: Bsomich
30  Dec  2010

2000-2010: How Technology Changed the Way We Work

2000-2010 brought about some rapid advances in enterprise technology. From cloud computing to SaaS, small and large businesses alike became equipped with cheaper, more efficient programs to conduct their operations. Improvements in web technology and the increased availability of information leveled the playing field for start-ups, entrepreneurs and virtual companies to compete with the “big guys” as an era of “collaboration” and “wikis” took the world by storm. Employees and business owners chose to work smarter rather than harder as competition in the service industry skyrocketed. And as Thomas Friedman predicted so eloquently, the world got flatter, and in this new world we developed new markets that spanned both coast and country lines. The ability of businesses to evolve on pace with technology quickly determined their success or demise, as departments that once had no tangent with IT found themselves reliant on it for daily operations.

It’s been an exciting decade of advancement and accomplishment in the ever-expanding fields of enterprise and web technology– two fields that power most businesses operations today.  Having had the benefit of using many of these emerging technologies at MIKE2.0, we look forward to what the next 10 years has in store for us and our members.

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
29  Dec  2010

Profile Spotlight: Steve Miller.

Steve Miller

Steve Miller is co-founder of a Chicago-based business intelligence (BI) services firm OpenBI, LLC, that specializes in delivering analytic solutions with both open source and commercial technologies. Miller has more than 30 years of experience in intelligence and analytics, having migrated from health care program evaluation, to database consulting with Oracle Corporation, to running a fast-growing BI services business at Braun Consulting. Advances in technology over that time have fundamentally enabled the use of quantitative methods for business differentiation. OpenBI, LLC, is all about helping customers attain that differentiation. Steve blogs frequently on Stats Man’s Corner at miller.openbi.com.

Category: Member Profiles
No Comments »

by: Phil Simon
27  Dec  2010

Tweety Bird and Aha! Moments


About three months ago, I started a data management and ETL project for a pretty big bank. Time was of the essence and the bank brought me in because I can get results. In this post, I explain why an overemphasis on results can be a really bad thing–and why all matching isn’t created equal. (more…)

Category: Information Development
9 Comments »

by: Bsomich
26  Dec  2010

Weekly IM Update.

 
 
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2010: A Year of Expansion for MIKE2.0

This year has brought some exciting changes for us at MIKE2.0.  In addition to launching our new site design, we began offering our wiki content in 5 other languages: Korean, Spanish, French, Chinese and Arabic.   We’ve also teamed up with some great folks in the Semantic web space, and continued building out our wiki in the areas of Business Intelligence and Data Quality Improvement and continued expanding our blog team and bookmarks section.  

If you haven’t had a chance to check out some of the new site content and features yet, please stop in for a visit during the holidays.   We have some great expansion plans for 2011 and are always open to member suggestions for improvement. 

Cheers and happy holidays!

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community  

 
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This Week’s Food for Thought:

Jerry Macquire and That Report

 A few years ago, it wasn’t too hard to quickly get my goat. You just had to follow this simple guide:

  1. Hire me to work for you in a report development or data management capacity.
  2. While concurrently working on a bunch of reports, tell me that there’s a problem with “that report.”
  3. Watch me chuckle and retort, “Oh, that one.”

I didn’t always laugh when I hear statements like these, but I do now. I have found that my reactions don’t irritate people too much. (Smiling is key.) Of course, many times I have vented with other developers about clients’ sometimes amazing ability to be as generic as possible when attempting to diagnose problems.

Read more.

  25 Data Management Dos and Don’ts

As new global regulatory reform dominated 2010, transparency, global entity identifiers, systemic risk monitoring, were among the top twenty five scenarios that became popular in the data management arena this year, according to a report issued Tuesday by the Enterprise Data Management Council, the trade group representing Wall Street’s largest data management experts. 

Read more.   

   The Networked Enterprise: Fact or Fiction?

McKinsey released some interesting research recently. They surveyed over 3,200 executives to find out how Web 2.0 technologies were being used within the enterprise. Sixty-six percent of the respondents stated that they do use Web 2.0 technologies within their organizations. What’s more interesting is that a good portion of those surveyed also said they are seeing a measurable business benefit.  

Read more.

 

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
24  Dec  2010

2010: A Year of Expansion for MIKE2.0

This year has brought some exciting changes for us at MIKE2.0.  In addition to launching our new site design, we began offering our wiki content in 5 other languages: Korean, Spanish, French, Chinese and Arabic.   We’ve also teamed up with some great folks in the Semantic web space, and continued building out our wiki in the areas of Business Intelligence and Data Quality Improvement and continued expanding our blog team and bookmarks section.  

If you haven’t had a chance to check out some of the new site content and features yet, please stop in for a visit during the holidays.   We have some great expansion plans for 2011 and are always open to member suggestions for improvement. 

Cheers and happy holidays!

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
22  Dec  2010

Profile Spotlight: Claude Super

Claude Super

Claude Super is an information governance expert at INFGOV.NET.  He is organized, disciplined, honest, passionate and independent, with extensive experience working with project managers and business leaders.
His strong technical background provides a deep understanding of complex technologies.  His information technology experience includes services oriented architecture (SOA) in the areas of ECM, archiving (IDARS), Output Management, Enterprise Information Management (EIM) and Information Governance.  Super is a strong leader, resistant to stress, and thrives in a collaborative environment.

Connect with Claude.

Category: Member Profiles
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by: Phil Simon
21  Dec  2010

Jerry Macguire and That Report

A few years ago, it wasn’t too hard to quickly get my goat. You just had to follow this simple guide:

  1. Hire me to work for you in a report development or data management capacity.
  2. While concurrently working on a bunch of reports, tell me that there’s a problem with “that report.”
  3. Watch me chuckle and retort, “Oh, that one.”

I didn’t always laugh when I hear statements like these, but I do now. I have found that my reactions don’t irritate people too much. (Smiling is key.) Of course, many times I have vented with other developers about clients’ sometimes amazing ability to be as generic as possible when attempting to diagnose problems.

A Quick Anecdote

A few years ago, I wrote about 250 individual reports for a large retail client. I was on that project for a long time because I quickly showed my clients that I knew what I was doing and could quickly turn a few statements into an actual report. I’ll never forget getting in the elevator one day with a guy for whom I was developing at least ten different reports. I wanted to grab a quick lunch and return to my desk. The conversation went something like this:

Elevator guy: Hey, Phil. That report isn’t right.

Me: Which one is this?

Elevator guy: You know, the one with the financial information. (Note: He worked in finance. Each of his 40 reports contained different types of financial information.)

Me: (jokingly and with that essential smile) Oh, sure. That one. What about it?

Eventually, elevator guy came around. He began prefacing his questions with little things like report names and specifics.

Focus

There’s a great deal going on during most data migration projects and system implementations–especially in tough economic times with lean staffs. Someone like me works with many different folks. Most of the time, employees are only working with one person like me. So, while I have to juggle multiple reporting requests from different folks, each individual employee’s focus is singular. People feel overwhelmed and just want to knock things off of their to do lists.

Simon Says: Be Specific!

To paraphrase from the Tom Cruise movie Jerry Macguire Help your developers help you. “The report isn’t right” is typically not very helpful. When diagnosing a problem, tell consultants and report developers about dates, steps, and specific file names. Take screen shots. Replicate the process. Share your screen as you try to access a page or run a report. We developers really can’t read minds and see over the Internet. You’ll be glad that you did. We will be able to help you solve the problem quicker.

Feedback

What say you?

Tags:
Category: Information Development, Information Management, Information Value
3 Comments »

by: Robert.hillard
19  Dec  2010

Information-Driven Business

Adapted from “Information-Driven Business: How to Manage Data and Information for Maximum Advantage”, by Robert Hillard. John Wiley & Sons, Inc..  See www.infodrivenbusiness.com.

The concept of information overload is permeating every business that I deal with.  At the same time, the global economy is moving from products to services which are described almost entirely electronically.  Even those businesses that are traditionally associated with making things are less concerned with the management of the manufacturing process (which is largely outsourced) than they are on the management of their intellectual property.

Increasingly, information doesn’t provide a window on the business.  It is the business.

It’s a simple equation. Intellectual property is tied-up in the data on computers.  If it is the subject of focused management, then greater value is extracted from that data.  If the intellectual property is a significant proportion of the value of the business, then such a focused effort will have a dramatic effect on the value of the business as a whole.  Such an effort will also make the organization much more enjoyable to work in with less time lost searching for information that should be readily available and less time sifting through irrelevant data that should never have hit the email inbox.

As business has become more complex, techniques are appearing almost every day which seek to simplify the task of managing a large multifaceted organization.  Their quest is similar to a physicist looking for the single unifying equation that will define the universe.  Any approach which recommends focusing on one part of the business must use a limited set of measures which aggregate complex data from across the enterprise.  In providing a simple answer, detail and differentiation must be lost.

A simple set of metrics by itself is no longer enough to sum up the millions or billions of moving parts that define the enterprise.  Perhaps, then, it is time to gain a better understanding of the role of information in business.

While large quantities of information have been with us for as long as humans have gathered in groups, it has taken on a whole new dynamic form.  The quantity of data has grown dramatically since the cost of computer storage dropped as it did at the end of the twentieth century.  The growth has taken business management by surprise and the techniques that we use have not been able to keep up.

With little differentiation in the bricks and mortar assets, business needs to enhance their service and differentiate using the informational resources at their disposal.  The winners tailor their product to the needs of their markets.  Successful leaders have a deep insight into the running of their business.  Such an insight can only come from accurate information.

In almost every organization, one or more executives have been assigned accountability for Information Governance, quality or records.  Similarly, technologists are being asked to make sense of the mountains of data that exist in databases, file systems and other repositories.

Treating information as something that needs to be managed in its own right, allows a profession of Information Managers to develop with a common approach to Information Management.  Without common techniques, many organizations have been ad-hoc in their approach.  The most successful, though, have borrowed approaches from other disciplines and been part of the evolution of a form of professional consensus.

Techniques are finally evolving to measure how useable information is (such as the Small Worlds Information Measure) and how much there is (Information Entropy).  Governance of the information economy is, at last, taking on some formality and businesses are at last reaping the benefits.  We are in the middle of an information revolution and perhaps we have moved from first principles to a more holistic view of what Information-Driven Business will look like when we come out the other side.

Category: Information Management, Information Strategy, Information Value
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
19  Dec  2010

Weekly IM Update.

 
 
 logo.jpg

What makes MIKE2.0 unique?

There are lots of great community sites for Information Management. A question that’s often asked is Why would I go to MIKE2.0? What makes MIKE2.0 unique?

Information Development

By creating a standard for Information Development through a common competency. This is really what the IM community needs and due to the complexity of the issue, a complete framework is needed solve the problem. That’s our primary goal with MIKE2.0 and something no other consulting firm provides. We’re also using this approach as an organizing framework for open source technology.

Integrated Content Repository

Through the Integrated Content Repository, organizations create mashups to the MIKE2.0 standard and the best assets on the web. We call this approach Governance 2.0 and it’s a solution we can build for our clients.

Open Methodology Framework

As far as we know, MIKE2.0 is the world’s first open and collaborative methodology, which sits between a Wikipedia-style model and something you would see with code.

From a community standpoint, we think the approach is working. Every day we’re seeing more visitors to MIKE2.0 and getting positive feedback. We still have a long way to go, and your contributions are much appreciated! 

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community  

 
Contribute to MIKE:

Start a new article, help with articles under construction or look for other ways to contribute.

Update your personal profile to advertise yourself to the community and interact with other members.

Useful Links:
Home Page
Login
Content Model
FAQs
MIKE2.0 Governance

Join Us on
42.gif

Follow Us on
43 copy.jpg

 Join Us on

images.jpg

Did You Know?
All content on MIKE2.0 and any contributions you make are published under the Creative Commons license. This allows you free re-use of our content as long as you add a brief reference back to us.

This Week’s Food for Thought:

Dummy Deadlines and Transparency

 As I wrap up a consulting engagement with a heavy data management bent, I’d like to impart a few lessons learned. Despite a tight deadline, change management issues, and data of a very interesting and inconsistent nature, I am leaving my current client satisfied. While this post offers no guarantees, it outlines two tips to improve the odds of success on data management projects.

Read more.

  Business Intelligence for Revenue Assurance in Communication Industry

People working in Communication Industry (Fixed and Mobile companies, circuit switched and IP) hear questions in executive meetings, for example

• How can we be sure that every minute of usage on our network produce an appropriate minute of revenue?
• Are the fixed charges for the dedicated circuits offered billed and collected?
• Does customer billing for pay-per-view selections match with settlements to content providers?
• Are we calculating bills correctly? What errors are being found in our billing verification efforts?

For decades, a dedicated department, with the name ‘Revenue Assurance (RA)’, is digging the answers for hundreds of such questions.

Read more.   

   Big Data, Small Data

I’ve heard the term”big data” used frequently by IM consultants and storage and data processing suppliers in the computing niche.  They’re all saying the same thing… that data is getting bigger, and we need even bigger tools and techniques to manage it. 

It’s no secret that we’ve seen an astronomical increase in the amount of data produced by companies due to the rise of social networking, online collaboration and other communication tools.  And due to the development of cloud computing, enterprises both large and small forming great stockyards of it.  

Read more.

 

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
16  Dec  2010

Big Data, Small Data…

I’ve heard the term”big data” used frequently by IM consultants and storage and data processing suppliers in the computing niche.  They’re all saying the same thing… that data is getting bigger, and we need even bigger tools and techniques to manage it. 

It’s no secret that we’ve seen an astronomical increase in the amount of data produced by companies due to the rise of social networking, online collaboration and other communication tools.   And due to the development of cloud computing, enterprises both large and small forming great stockyards of it.  It’s almost like a game to see who can collect the largest amount. 

In my mind, it’s not about whether your data is big or small.  It’s about what you can and more importantly, will do with it.  It’s about your ability to form useable intelligence from it.  The troubling part these days is not about the increase of data, it’s that most companies are willingly stockpiling it without a strategy or system to make sense of it.

Category: Information Development
1 Comment »

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