Open Framework, Information Management Strategy & Collaborative Governance | Data & Social Methodology - MIKE2.0 Methodology
Members
Collapse Expand Close

To join, please contact us.

Improve MIKE 2.0
Collapse Expand Close
Need somewhere to start? How about the most wanted pages; or the pages we know need more work; or even the stub that somebody else has started, but hasn't been able to finish. Or create a ticket for any issues you have found.

Archive for March, 2015

by: Robert.hillard
28  Mar  2015

The change you can’t see, or what’s your horse carcass?

I had the pleasure this month of launching the Australian edition of Deloitte’s Tech Tends 2015 report.  For a number of years now, we’ve put our necks on the line to predict what will happen in the immediate, and slightly longer, term.  Looking back over recent years, we can see the rise of cloud, the reinvention of the role of core IT systems and the evolution of management of technology in business.

Interestingly, the time we’ve been doing these predictions in this particular format has coincided with a peculiar period in computing history when most of the innovation found in business started life in the consumer world.  To a large degree, this trend is the result of the boom of smartphones in the late naughties.

This is not the long-term norm.  Over the five decades since computing became an important part of business technology, the enterprise led and hobbyists had to pick up the scraps until they could get the price to a point where a product that appealed to consumers could be mass produced.

The return of the enterprise

This year has seen a return to the norm.  Some of the hyped technologies like 3-D printing turn out to have more application in business than the home.  Freed from looking to consumers, business has renewed confidence to innovate from the ground-up.  This, in-turn, has the potential to accelerate innovation and enable disruptive rather than evolutionary trends.

It is often hard to move consumer technologies quickly when big investments are required.  To get a return on this capital, large numbers of people need to be moved to open their wallets to get an acceptable return.  Enterprise solutions, on the other hand, can focus on niche problems without needing to worry about standards or mass movements of people due to the rapid return on capital.

It’s entirely possible, for instance, that big business investments in autonomous vehicles will have the same impact as large-scale manufacturing did on advancing robotics in the 1970s and 1980s.  The renewed focus is particularly evident in mining where large distances and controlled environments make early investment not only possible but also rapid returns feasible.

This exciting new period of innovation leads us to ask whether we are really planning for our society of the future or if we are limiting our thinking.  The answer matters because there is a lot of money being invested by both governments and business based on their current assumptions on what the future will bring.

Horse carcasses

In the late nineteenth century, city planners were dealing the exponential growth in populations and wealth.  They were planning how to deal with one of the most visible forms of technology in every street: the horse.  In the last part of the 1800s, New York City had nearly 200,000 horses.  With the tough conditions they worked under, many horses could expect to live just two to four years with the carcasses being a problem on par with the food they required and the manure they produced.

The Times of London famously predicted around this time that every street would be buried under nine feet of horse-generated waste by 1950!

It’s no wonder that these were the problems that city planners thought they would be dealing with through the then-new twentieth century.  Of course, the arrival of the motor car was both foreseeable by anyone looking back at the history of the internal combustion engine and almost unforseen by city planners of the time.

I wonder whether there are horse carcasses that we simply can’t look past when planning our society of the next century.

Reinventing our cities

A candidate list of these “horse carcasses” would have to start with transport, the issue that planners of the turn of the last century couldn’t look past.  Debate rages in cities around the world about the amount of investment that should go into roads and public transport (predominantly rail).  At the same time, the autonomous car, which seemed a dream just a few years ago, is very much on the verge of reality.

Autonomous vehicles, operating in concert and optimised through the power of analytics, can increase the density of road traffic by an order of magnitude, allowing cities to utilise existing roads with little need to upgrade capacity for many decades.  Similarly, a considered approach to shared resources means that public transport as we know it today is effectively rendered obsolete.

Imagine a future where you simply press a button on your smart device and a vehicle takes you where you want to go.  No waiting, timetables or congestion.

Reinventing our society

Any serious vision of the future has to consider economics and the future of growth.  For the vast majority of the history of humanity the underlying economic growth rate has been a fraction of one percent compared to the high growth achieved since the industrial revolution.

The big question is whether society should build-in assumptions about growth and the only tool to achieve it: technology.  Looking back, from the vantage of the late twenty first century, the answer will seem obvious and we will kick ourselves if we haven’t either taken advantage of the great opportunity to leverage our growth or conversely saved wisely for a more austere future.

One of the most important decisions that the growth or austerity alternative futures will drive is our willingness to invest in our personal wellbeing through healthcare.  We are planning our society around increasing healthcare costs and actively thinking about rationing schemes around the world.  But what happens if the human body simply becomes a technology problem which is solved.

It is very hard to look past humans living for 80 to 100 years.  While recent centuries have seen a substantial increase in our life expectancy, it hasn’t been transformational.  Rather more people have enjoyed a healthier life towards the higher end of the expected lifespan.

Science, however, could be on the verge of breaking through the current barriers of our biology with an almost unimaginable impact on our society.

Reinventing our work lives

Futurists of the 1960s and 1970s expected the twenty-first century to be challenged by a lack of employment.  While the first decades show no sign of realising this prediction, they could still be right.  The second generation of artificial intelligence could finally achieve this vision.

Such a society could be extremely wealthy and choose to put the interests of its people first by sharing the opportunity to contribute while rewarding outcomes over effort.  Conversely, the wealth could easily get concentrated in the hands of a few with little opportunity for those without a role to enjoy the spoils.

Reinventing our diets

Finally, even what we eat is likely to change in ways that seem unimaginable.  Most futurists agree that an increasingly wealthy world will create a huge demand for protein, primarily through meat which requires an enormous amount of land to produce.

An alternative now seems likely.  Technology which can produce meat independently of any animal through stem cells is nearing maturity.  Such a product could be indistinguishable from meat produced from a slaughtered animal.  The change this would cause in agribusiness will be of the same magnitude as the digital disruption so many industries are already experiencing.

Maybe this is the carcass we can’t look past today.  Rather than a horse, this carcass belongs to cows, sheep and poultry.

Tags:
Category: Enterprise2.0
No Comments »

by: Jonathan
26  Mar  2015

5 Challenges facing the Internet of Things

Our constant need to be connected has expanded beyond smartphones and tablets into a wider network of interconnected objects. These objects, often referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT), have the ability to communicate with other devices and are constantly connected to the internet in order to record, store and exchange data.

This idea of an “always on, always connected” device does seem a little big brother-ish, but there are definitely some benefits that come with it. For example, we are already seeing smarter thermostats, like Nest, that allow us to remotely control the temperature of our homes. We also have appliances and cars with internet connectivity, that can learn our behavior, and act on their own to provide us with greater functionality. However, while this is an accelerating trend with already many objects on the market, there are still a number of challenges facing IoT, which will continue to hinder its progress and widespread adoption.

Security

It seems as if every discussion surrounding networks and the internet is always followed by a discussion on security. Given the recent publicity of damaging security breaches at major corporations, it’s hard to turn a blind eye to the dangers of more advanced cyber attacks. There’s no hiding the fact that the introduction of IoT will create a number of additional vulnerabilities that’ll need to be protected. Otherwise, these devices will simply turn into easy access points for cyber criminals. Given that IoT is new technology, there aren’t a lot of security options designed specifically for them. Furthermore, the diversity in device types makes uniform solutions very difficult. Until we see greater security measures and programs designed to handle IoT devices, many will remain hesitant to adopt them for personal and professional use.

Privacy

On the coattails of security comes privacy. One of bigger debates in this age of data is who actually owns the data being created. Is it the users of these devices, the manufacturers, or those who operate the networks. Right now, there’s no clear answer. Regardless, while we are left arguing who owns what information, these devices are tracking how we use them. Your car knows which route you take to work, and your home knows what temperature you prefer in the mornings. In addition, when you consider that almost everything requires an online profile to operate these days, there can be a tremendous amount of private information available to many different organizations. For all we know, our televisions are watching us as we watch our favorite shows, and sending that information to media companies.

Interoperability

In order to create a pure, interconnected IoT ecosystem, there needs to be a seamless experience between different devices. Currently, we haven’t yet achieved that level of interoperability. The problem is that there are so many different makes and models, it’s incredibly difficult to create an IoT system with horizontal platforms that are communicable, operable, and programmable. Right now, IoT communication is fragmented, and many devices are still not able to ‘talk’ with one another. Manufacturers will need to start playing nice with each other, and create devices that are willing to work with competitors.

WAN Capacity

Existing Wide Area Networks (WAN) have been built for moderate-bandwidth requirements capable of handling current device needs. However, the rapid introduction of new devices will dramatically increase WAN traffic, which could strangle entreprise bandwidth. With the growing popularity of Bring Your Own Device policies, people will begin using IoT devices at work, forcing companies to make the necessary upgrades, or suffer crawling speeds and weakened productivity.

Big Data

IoT technology will benefit and simplify many aspects of our lives, but these devices serve a dual purpose, benefiting organizations hungry for information. We live in an era of big data, where organizations are looking to collect information from as many sources as possible in the hopes of learning more about customers and markets. IoT technology will greatly expand the possibilities of data collection. However, the problem then becomes managing this avalanche of data. Storage issues aside, we’ve only just developed improved ways of handling big data analytics, but technologies and platforms will need to further evolve to handle additional demands.

Tags: ,
Category: Web2.0
No Comments »

by: RickDelgado
24  Mar  2015

The Debate Continues: The Future Impact of Net Neutrality on the Cloud

The debate over Net Neutrality is far from over. While the recent ruling by the FCC to classify broadband internet as a public utility may have changed the argument, debates will undoubtedly still continue to take place. The effects the decision has on the web will likely not be felt, let alone understood, for many years to come, but that hasn’t stopped speculation over what a neutral internet will actually look like and how companies and internet service providers (ISPs) will be impacted. At the same time, the future of cloud computing has become a hot topic as experts debate if Net Neutrality will be a boost to cloud providers or if the overall effect will be negative. Looking at the current evidence and what many providers, companies, and experts are saying, the only thing that’s clear is that few people can agree on what Net Neutrality will mean for the cloud and all the advantages of cloud computing.

The basic idea of Net Neutrality is, in the simplest of terms, to treat all internet traffic the same. Whether from a small niche social site or a major online retail hub, content would be delivered equally. This sounds perfectly reasonable on the surface, but critics of the Net Neutrality concept say all websites simply aren’t equal. Sites like Netflix and YouTube (mainly video streaming sites) eat up large amounts of bandwidth when compared to the rest of the internet, and as streaming sites grow in popularity, they keep eating up more and more web resources. The theory goes that ISPs would provide internet “fast lanes” to those sites willing to pay the fee, giving them more bandwidth in comparison to other sites, which would be stuck in “slow lanes.” It’s this idea that proponents of Net Neutrality want to guard against, and it’s one of the biggest points of contention in the debate.

Obviously, this is a simplified view of Net Neutrality, but it’s a good background when looking at the effect the new ruling could have on cloud computing. First, let’s take a look at how cloud providers may be affected without a neutral internet. Supporters of Net Neutrality say a “fast lane” solution would represent an artificial competitive advantage for those sites with the resources to pay for it. That could mean a lack of innovation on the part of cloud vendors as they spend added funds to get their data moved more quickly while getting a leg up on their competition. A non-neutral internet may also slow cloud adoption among smaller businesses. If a cloud software provider has to pay more for fast lanes, those costs can easily be passed on to the consumer, which would raise the barrier to cloud use. The result may be declining cloud adoption rates, or at the least performance of cloud-based software may degrade.

On the other side of the coin, critics of Net Neutrality say the effect of the policy will end up damaging cloud computing providers. They’re quick to point out that innovation on the internet has been rampant without new government regulations, and that ISPs could easily develop other innovative solutions besides the “fast lane” approach Net Neutrality supporters are so afraid of. Government rules can also be complicated and, in the case of highly technical fields, would need to be constantly updated as new technology is developed. This may give larger companies and cloud providers an advantage over their competition since they would have the resources to devote to lobbyists and bigger legal budgets to dedicate to understanding new rules. There’s also the concern over getting the government involved in the control of pricing and profits in the first place. Needless to say, many aren’t comfortable with giving that level of control to a large bureaucracy and would rather let market freedom take hold.

Some may say that with the new FCC ruling, these arguments don’t apply anymore, but changes and legal challenges will likely keep this debate lively for the foreseeable future. Will Net Neutrality lead to government meddling in cloud provider pricing and contracts? Will a lack of Net Neutrality slow down cloud adoption and give too much power to ISPs? Unfortunately, there’s no way of knowing the far-reaching consequences of the decision on the cloud computing landscape. It could end up having very little impact in the long run, but for now, it appears Net Neutrality will become a reality. Whether that’s a good or bad thing for the cloud remains to be seen.

 

Tags: ,
Category: Enterprise Data Management
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
19  Mar  2015

MIKE2.0 Community Update

Missed what’s been happening in the MIKE2.0 data management community? Read on:

Click to view this email in a browser

  
 logo.jpg

The Transformation to a Data-Driven Business: Join us at EDW15!

Attending Enterprise Data World in DC later this month? We look forward to seeing you!

The Enterprise Data World (EDW) Conference is recognized as the most comprehensive educational conference on data management in the world.

What to Expect at EDW 2015:

  • Enterprise Data Strategy
  • Data Governance Program Implementation
  • Building for New Demands of Data Architecture
  • Data Quality Measurements and Scorecarding
  • Big Data Trends and Technologies
  • Rolling out Master Data Management
  • EIM – Transforming into Data-driven Business
  • Real-time Analytics & Business Intelligence
  • Best Practices in all aspects of Enterprise Data Management
  • Agile Data Methods

Most importantly, you’ll hear from DAMA and the MGA team about some exciting new developments planned for the MIKE2.0 community this year.

We hope to see you there!

Not registered yet? Visit http://edw2015.dataversity.net or contact us for details.

Sincerely,MIKE2.0 Community

Contribute to MIKE:

Start a new article, help with articles under construction or look for other ways to contribute

Update your personal profile to advertise yourself to the community and interact with other members.

Useful Links:
Home Page
Login
Content Model
FAQs
MIKE2.0 Governance

Join Us on
42.gif

Follow Us on
43 copy.jpg

Join Us on
images.jpg

Did You Know?
All content on MIKE2.0 and any contributions you make are published under the Creative Commons license. This allows you free re-use of our content as long as you add a brief reference back to us.

 

This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

Cloud Services: Open vs Proprietary  

There’s nothing more punk-rock than the sort of DIY ethics currently fueling open-source communities. The general subversiveness combined with an apparent twice-a-week minimum black t-shirt rule among developers may make the open source scene look kind of like a cool-guy/girl clique, at least from an outsider’s perspective.

Everybody is rebelling against something, right?

Read more.

5 Ways Big Data is Changing the World of Design

Back in the analog days, designers used hands-on tools to bring their creations to light. But in this day and age of information and advanced technology big data and analytics tools are transforming the world of design as never before.In a November 2014 article on wired.com Paul Papas, “the Global Leader for the IBM’s Interactive Experience practice, a next-generation digital agency, consultancy, and systems integrator,” discusses the revolutionizing power of big data in all facets and fields of design. Compiled from the author’s views and insights is this list of 5 ways big data is transforming the world of design.

Read more. 

Making the Case for Jargon, Acronyms and Clear Language

All over the web, authors are ranting about the misuse of the English language in business.  It’s an easy article to write, picking out examples of jargon and the general torturing of sentences in the name of explaining apparently simple concepts while making the writer seem more impressive.

Some great examples from business can be found in this Forbes article: The Most Annoying, Pretentious and Useless Business Jargon.  Examples that I like (or hate) include terms like “swim lanes”, “best practice” and “core competence.”

Read more. 

  Forward this message to a friend

 

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
17  Mar  2015

The Transformation to a Data-Driven Business: Join us at EDW15!

Attending Enterprise Data World in DC later this month? We look forward to seeing you!

The Enterprise Data World (EDW) Conference is recognized as the most comprehensive educational conference on data management in the world.

What to Expect at EDW 2015:

  • Enterprise Data Strategy
  • Data Governance Program Implementation
  • Building for New Demands of Data Architecture
  • Data Quality Measurements and Scorecarding
  • Big Data Trends and Technologies
  • Rolling out Master Data Management
  • EIM – Transforming into Data-driven Business
  • Real-time Analytics & Business Intelligence
  • Best Practices in all aspects of Enterprise Data Management
  • Agile Data Methods

Most importantly, you’ll hear from DAMA and the MGA team about some exciting new developments planned for the MIKE2.0 community this year.

We hope to see you there!

Not registered yet? Visit http://edw2015.dataversity.net or contact us for details.

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

Calendar
Collapse Expand Close
TODAY: Thu, September 21, 2017
March2015
SMTWTFS
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930311234
Archives
Collapse Expand Close
Recent Comments
Collapse Expand Close