Open Framework, Information Management Strategy & Collaborative Governance | Data & Social Methodology - MIKE2.0 Methodology
Members
Collapse Expand Close

To join, please contact us.

Improve MIKE 2.0
Collapse Expand Close
Need somewhere to start? How about the most wanted pages; or the pages we know need more work; or even the stub that somebody else has started, but hasn't been able to finish. Or create a ticket for any issues you have found.

Archive for May, 2015

by: Robert.hillard
29  May  2015

Who are we leaving behind?

I was recently invited to deliver the keynote address at the University of Melbourne engineering and IT awards night.  I took the opportunity to challenge today’s students to think about the people being left behind as in the move to a digital economy.

Some 25 years ago I had the privilege of attending this university.  In thinking about tonight and the achievements of so many of you, I couldn’t help reflecting on the challenges my generation faced entering professional life in the 1990s and comparing them to what you will see in the decades ahead.

Wherever you turn in the media you are hearing the term “digital disruption”.  For those of us lucky enough to be educated in the so-called STEM disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, we probably feel empowered and excited by the talk of “digital disruption”.  How could we not look forward to using the technology of our time to replace the cars we drive with electric vehicles, our plastic credit cards with mobile wallets or the work cubicle of my generation with working flexibly at a local café.

We must not forget that the same sense of optimism is not necessarily true for societies around the world.  At a macro-level, where there is technological disruption, business disruption follows.  But where there is business disruption, social disruption is all too often the result.

Already email has all-but killed traditional mail.  Mainstream bookstores are a shadow of their former selves.  I can’t remember the last time I was in a record or CD store.  Hardly any businesses worry about advertising in the telephone directory.  Each of these changes has cost jobs and not everyone who lost out has found a role in the changing economy.

We have a responsibility to make sure that change is not only good for those of us lucky enough to have access to the right skills, but also to make change good for society as a whole.  Future generations will judge us by how we navigate the next two decades.

Change leaves winners and losers

We should be under no illusion, the changes we are going to go through in transport, energy and, particularly, financial services will leave far more at a disadvantage than any change that we have seen so far in the era of the Internet.

Does it matter that the next wave of innovation could see the end of local media content rules?  Does it matter that Department stores could be wiped out in Australia?  Does it matter that banks could be taken to the brink by a wave of fintech innovators, including peer-to-peer lending?

Take the last of these; replacing banks sounds an awful lot like risking the failure of the banks.  Whether it was in the nineteenth century, twentieth century or most recently in the GFC in this century, whenever banks have gone down many ordinary people have been badly hurt.

Disruption spurred-on by digital technology is extending into mainstream engineering, for example, batteries are looking to finally fill the gap of solar energy, providing stored base load power for when the sun isn’t shining and electric vehicles that hardly need servicing.  We could be just a few years away from houses going off-grid en masse.  These changes will leave car dealerships without a source of service income and power utilities without a market.

The concentration of wealth

The birth of the commercial Internet offered an opportunity for small business to compete with large companies with many of the advantages of scale and geography being removed.  At the turn of the century we saw an opportunity for a utopia of innovation spread across the globe with the rewards reaching far more people than ever before.

20 years in and the reality is not entirely aligned to this vision.  The network effect means that there are advantages to scale.  The more people that use the same search engine, the better its algorithms.  The more people that use the same music service the better its catalogue.  The more people that use the same social network, the greater its reach.

However, the evidence is that the groundswell of innovation is turning the tide with new money pouring into start-ups regardless of location and value being added in more locations that ever before.  That is where this room can lift its sights.  Seek to add value to the local economy where you and your family want to live and where you can see a society that you want to build.  Don’t be afraid to resist the pull to traditional centres of innovation. Don’t just think of your personal wealth but also of where your effort will contribute to your community.

Using technology as part of the solution

We in this room have the ability to channel our knowledge, skills and innovative flair to not only develop new applications of technology but also to corral and encourage the application of technology in such a way as to minimise unintended consequences and potential achieve new benefits for our society.

We can choose to enable a sharing economy, created through yet more innovations such as 99designs, Kaggle, Freelancer, Airbnb, DriveMyCar, and so many more, which provide income to a wider range of people using their available talent and resources.

We can choose to support local talent through the development of great ideas and then seeing them through to commercial success.  We can use automation and 3D printing to enable local manufacturing.  We can develop specialised services which are ready to be purchased by government and industry so that they are less dependent on imports.

I refuse to believe that we can’t use technology to improve access to capital while maintaining a safe financial system.  I am convinced that we can find better ways to access products and services without doing away with storefronts.  I know that we can make the move from fossil fuels to renewables while keeping a highly skilled engineering capability locally.

In conclusion

You will face different professional challenges to those that I faced as I approached the end of my education at this university.  You will be the shapers of society in the decades ahead.  You will help decide whether to throw ourselves headlong into technology-driven disruption or whether to keep a watch out for those who are left behind. You will decide whether you will be drawn into ever greater geographic concentration of innovation or if you will take the path to keeping value in the community you want to be part of.

I hope you will seek to make the right choices with the education you have worked so hard to earn.

Thank-you.

Tags: ,
Category: Enterprise2.0
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
18  May  2015

MIKE2.0 Community Update

Click to view this email in a browser

 

 

Missed what’s been happening in the MIKE2.0 data management community? Check out our latest update:

 logo.jpg

How Do You Define Your Master Data? 

There are numerous definitions for “master data” ranging from one sentence to a few paragraphs.  This is perhaps the most straightforward one I’ve come across:

Master data is the core data that is essential to operations in a specific business or business unit. - via Whatis.com

A clear and simple definition, yet a lot of companies often struggle to adhere to it when identifying and qualifying master data for their organizations.

Why do you think this is?

Although data is often looked at on a transactional basis, master data typically makes up a large a percentage of the data elements in any given transaction. Common examples of master data include:

  • Customer data (name, contact details, DOB, customer classification)
  • Locality data (physical address, postal address, geographical data)
  • Product data (item number, bill of materials, product codes)
  • Employee data (employee number, role, placement in organisational structure)
  • Partner data (partner name, classification)

It is not unusual for this same data to be held in dozens or even hundreds of applications across a large organization, and may be difficult to isolate and collect.   Much of the data has been held in legacy systems for years and may be held in a fashion where data is poorly integrated and at low levels of quality.  Many organizations have poorly implemented Data Governance processes to handle changes in this data over time.

MIKE2.0 offers an open source solution for managing master data that outlines many of the issues organizations have with identifying it.

We hope you find this offering of benefit and welcome any suggestions you may have to improve it.

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community

Popular Content

Did you know that the following wiki articles are most popular on Google? Check them out, and feel free to edit or expand them!

What is MIKE2.0?
Deliverable Templates
The 5 Phases of MIKE2.0
Overall Task List
Business Assessment Blueprint
SAFE Architecture
Information Governance Solution

Contribute to MIKE:

Start a new article, help with articles under construction or look for other ways to contribute

Update your personal profile to advertise yourself to the community and interact with other members.

Useful Links:
Home Page
Login
Content Model
FAQs
MIKE2.0 Governance

Join Us on
42.gif

Follow Us on
43 copy.jpg

Join Us on
 images.jpg

 

This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

5 Unusual Ways Businesses are Using Big Data

Big data is where it’s at. At least, that’s what we’ve been told. So it should come as no surprise that businesses are busy imagining ways they can take advantage of big data analytics to grow their companies. Many of these uses are fairly well documented, like improving marketing efforts, or gaining a better understanding of their customers, or even figuring out better ways to detect and prevent fraud. The most common big data use cases have become an important part of industries the world over, but big data can be used for much more than that. In fact, many companies out there have come up with creative and unusual uses for big data analytics, showing just how versatile and helpful big data can be.

Read more.

Cloud Computing and the Industries that Love It

Cloud computing provides greater security, virtually unlimited computing resources for research and development, cost savings, and advanced threat detection methods. With so many reasons to use cloud computing, it’s no wonder many industries have flocked to the new technology. Cloud technology serves as a form of outsourcing for companies, where some data is kept in house for better control, and other data is trusted to a third-party provider. Each industry that benefits from cloud computing has their own specific reasons for adopting the technology, but cloud computing is most profitable for companies that work with emerging markets and need quick and cost effective scalability.

Read more.
Is Your Data Quality Boring? 

Let’s be honest here. Data Quality is good and worthy, but it can be a pretty dull affair at times. Information Management is something that “just happens”, and folks would rather not know the ins-and-outs of how the monthly Management Pack gets created. Yet I’ll bet that they’ll be right on your case when the numbers are “wrong.” Right?

So here’s an idea. The next time you want to engage someone in a discussion about data quality, don’t start by discussing data quality. Don’t mention the processes of profiling, validating or cleansing data. Don’t talk about integration, storage or reporting. And don’t even think about metadata, lineage or auditability.

Read more.

Forward this message to a friendQuestions?

If you have any questions, please email us at mike2@openmethodology.org. 

 

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
12  May  2015

Defining Master Data

There are numerous definitions for “master data” ranging from one sentence to a few paragraphs.  This is perhaps the most straightforward one I’ve come across:

Master data is the core data that is essential to operations in a specific business or business unit. - via Whatis.com

A clear and simple definition, yet a lot of companies often struggle to adhere to it when identifying and qualifying master data for their organizations.

Why do you think this is?

Although data is often looked at on a transactional basis, master data typically makes up a large a percentage of the data elements in any given transaction. Common examples of master data include:

  • Customer data (name, contact details, DOB, customer classification)
  • Locality data (physical address, postal address, geographical data)
  • Product data (item number, bill of materials, product codes)
  • Employee data (employee number, role, placement in organisational structure)
  • Partner data (partner name, classification)

It is not unusual for this same data to be held in dozens or even hundreds of applications across a large organization, and may be difficult to isolate and collect.   Much of the data has been held in legacy systems for years and may be held in a fashion where data is poorly integrated and at low levels of quality.  Many organizations have poorly implemented Data Governance processes to handle changes in this data over time.

MIKE2.0 offers an open source solution for managing master data that outlines many of the issues organizations have with identifying it.

How do you define and qualify your master data?

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

Calendar
Collapse Expand Close
TODAY: Mon, April 24, 2017
May2015
SMTWTFS
262728293012
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31123456
Archives
Collapse Expand Close
Recent Comments
Collapse Expand Close