Framing new ideas

It often feels like every idea has its time.  Be it workplace trends, new technologies or social changes.  With the benefit of hindsight, we can’t imagine why these things took so long.  Yet, when a good idea’s time hasn’t yet come, it is incredibly hard to get innovations off the ground in business or government anywhere in the world.

Equality for everyone in the workplace seems so obvious it is outrageous that it took so long (and unacceptable that it is still an issue in so many areas, but that is a separate topic).  Workplace safety was once almost ignored but is now simply the norm.  The idea of telecommuting was controversial but now most professionals take it granted for at least some of their job.  Yet before all three of these changes became mainstream they seemed just as compelling but too hard to make into reality.

Humans are social animals and we like to move in a herd.  As much as we laud pioneers, we are seldom comfortable being too far out in front.  So where does that leave all of us who are trying to create change and enable transformation in business?

That change is necessary must be obvious to anyone who looks at the poor rate of productivity growth over many years and the graveyard of businesses that just haven’t spotted disruption in their sectors.  How do we bring forward the “time” for every idea rather than wait?

New ideas don’t just happen because they are logical.  The herd has to provide leaders with a sense of protection and the people who follow have to be more than vocally supportive, they have to move with them.  Leveraging our social instincts we can give people confidence to try new things, such as new technologies, by either moving the herd or creating a paddock where it feels like the herd is already headed.

The latter requires a level of creativity.  The sense that the herd is moving when they may only be just starting to break.  This requires those who seek to introduce something new to “frame the market”.  It creates certainty (continuing the paddock metaphor, it is describing to the herd where the fences are).

Many proponents of new technologies and solutions are amazed that their proposals aren’t immediately adopted.  This is as true today with technologies such as robotic process automation and social media at work as it was with email and graphical user interfaces in the 1980s and early 1990s.  I remember having a debate in one organisation I worked with about whether staff should have access to the internet at all, a laughable proposition now but a very real concern to the leaders at the time.  What swayed them was when their peers in comparable organisations allowed their staff access (they could take comfort in being part of the herd).

Business transformation, combining technology and organisational change is about as big as any change that we need to tackle and brings in new organisational models.  Anyone seeking to introduce automation, streamlining and simplification needs to make the case that these are mainstream concepts.  Vendors looking to sell these capabilities should consider moving away from claiming their wares are unique to putting them in the context of a wider market that is already there.

It is the dream of everyone who operates in a competitive marketplace to be the owner of a monopoly franchise.  Putting aside the fact that a lack of competition makes us lazy, the evidence is that buyers avoid buying at all if they don’t have some sort of choice.

Even the solutions who appear for a time to be in a category of one (such as Windows or Facebook) have grown as a result of being part of a market.  Uber needs Lyft, Windows needed the Mac and Facebook was possible because of Myspace.

We see this today in a range of technologies that could accelerate productivity but are struggling to gain traction.  Each has vendors who claim to have a monopoly on a specific component and a market that is very hard to frame.  Gartner talk in terms of their “hype cycle” where, at the peak of the hype, the innovations has been shown to have some sort of value.  However, at that peak it is hard for users to make a comparison and the market is left to a few early adopters.

What this means for those of us trying to create change is that if we want organisations to adopt new ways of working, new technologies and new approaches to skills we need to frame the market and collaborate with our competitors to create a larger opportunity.

Collaboration between competitors can take the form of common standards, methods or even just the adoption of similar language to enable organisations to make meaningful comparisons.  After all, we now expect to go into supermarkets and see the price per unit of weight and nutritional information in a form where we can make a reasonable comparison between competing products.  The same should be true of more complex products and services used by organisations.

When ideas are new, collaboration can create larger and more competitive markets which benefits everyone.

Category: Enterprise2.0
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