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Archive for the ‘Information Development’ Category

by: Bsomich
25  Aug  2015

Where in MIKE2.0 Should Data Protection and Privacy Live?

With the ever increasing demand for compliance with outside regulators and statutes, should MIKE2.0 look to expand data protection and privacy as a solution offering?

This question was posed by a community member in our forum this week with the context below:

While Information Security as a solution may cover some aspects, the wider requirements will need to involve the same information and data. In the UK, a subject access request means any data / information in structured, semi structured or unstructured form about an individual can be demanded. Similarly, Freedom of Information requests need analysis and assignment. These need a cross functional management system that deals with the same assets and resources as covered by the rest of information management.

It is a day-to-day, cross functional management activity that needs responsibility assigned. Accountability can tie in with the governance part of MIKE 2.0., but does it need added to the solutions? And if so, where?

We’d love your feedback on this potential offering in the comments section below.

Category: Information Development
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by: Bsomich
30  Jul  2015

MIKE2.0 Community Update

Missed what’s been happening in the MIKE2.0 data management community this month? Read on!

 

 logo.jpg

Data Governance: How competent is your organization?

One of the key concepts of the MIKE2.0 Methodology is that of an Organisational Model for Information Development. This is an organisation that provides a dedicated competency for improving how information is accessed, shared, stored and integrated across the environment.

Organisational models need to be adapted as the organisation moves up the 5 Maturity Levels for organisations in relation to the Information Development competencies below:

Level 1 Data Governance Organisation – Aware 

  • An Aware Data Governance Organisation knows that the organisation has issues around Data Governance but is doing little to respond to these issues. Awareness has typically come as the result of some major issues that have occurred that have been Data Governance-related. An organisation may also be at the Aware state if they are going through the process of moving to state where they can effectively address issues, but are only in the early stages of the programme.
Level 2 Data Governance Organisation – Reactive
  • Reactive Data Governance Organisation is able to address some of its issues, but not until some time after they have occurred. The organisation is not able to address root causes or predict when they are likely to occur. “Heroes” are often needed to address complex data quality issues and the impact of fixes done on a system-by-system level are often poorly understood.
Level 3 Data Governance Organisation – Proactive
  • Proactive Data Governance Organisation can stop issues before they occur as they are empowered to address root cause problems. At this level, the organisation also conducts ongoing monitoring of data quality to issues that do occur can be resolved quickly.
Level 4 Data Governance Organisation – Managed
Level 5 Data Governance Organisation – Optimal

The MIKE2.0 Solution for the the Centre of Excellence provides an overall approach to improving Data Governance through a Centre of Excellence delivery model for Infrastructure Development and Information Development. We recommend this approach as the most efficient and effective model for building these common set of capabilities across the enterprise environment.

Feel free to check it out when you have a moment and offer any suggestions you may have to improve it.

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community

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This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

Anxious About BYOD? Here are Some Tips for Success

Has your organization caved to the pressure of establishing a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy and is now having second thoughts? Making company-wide policy changes and satisfying tech-savvy employees’ desires is just the beginning. Once BYOD is up and running, there are many challenges. The difference between success and failure means addressing key concerns and finding ways to overcome these issues.

Read more.

Are We Missing the Mark with Real-Time Marketing?

If any press is good press, then Totinos can chalk up its latest Super Bowl marketing antics for a win. However, it’s questionable whether the brand will gain any true business value from live-tweeting the game a day early. In fact, marketers should step back and consider whether our obsession with vanity metrics and viral campaigns is distracting us from the true potential of real-time and data-driven marketing.

Read more.

Don’t seek to know everything about your customer

I hate customer service surveys. Hotels and retailers spend millions trying to speed our checkout or purchase by helping us avoid having to wait around. Then they undo all of that good work by pestering us with customer service surveys which take longer than any queue that they’ve worked so hard to remove!
Perhaps I’d be less grumpy if all of the data that organisations spend so much time, much of it ours, collecting was actually applied in a way that provided tangible value. The reality is that most customer data simply goes to waste (I argue this in terms of “decision entropy” in chapter 6 of my book, Information-Driven Business).

Read more.

 

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Category: Information Development
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by: Robert.hillard
25  Jul  2015

Don’t seek to know everything about your customer

I hate customer service surveys. Hotels and retailers spend millions trying to speed our checkout or purchase by helping us avoid having to wait around. Then they undo all of that good work by pestering us with customer service surveys which take longer than any queue that they’ve worked so hard to remove!

Perhaps I’d be less grumpy if all of the data that organisations spend so much time, much of it ours, collecting was actually applied in a way that provided tangible value. The reality is that most customer data simply goes to waste (I argue this in terms of “decision entropy” in chapter 6 of my book, Information-Driven Business).

Customer data is expensive

Many years ago, I interviewed a large bank about their data warehouse. It was the 1990s and the era of large databases was just starting to arrive. The bank had achieved an impressive feat of engineering by building a huge repository of customer data, although they admitted it had cost a phenomenal sum of money to build.

The project was a huge technical success overcoming so many of the performance hurdles that plagued large databases of the time. It was only in the last few minutes of the interview that the real issue started to emerge. The data warehouse investment was in vain, the products that they were passionate about taking to their customers were deliberately generic and there was little room for customisation. Intimate customer data was of little use in such an environment.

Customer data can be really useful but it comes at a cost. There is the huge expense of maintaining the data and there is the good will that you draw upon in order to collect it. Perhaps most importantly, processes to identify a customer and manage the relationship add friction to almost every transaction.

Imagine that you own a clothing or electrical goods store. From your vantage point behind the counter you see a customer run up to you with cash in one hand and a product in the other. They look like they’re in a hurry and thrust the cash at you. Do you a) take the cash and thank them; or b) ask them to stop before they pay and register for your loyalty programme often including a username and password? It’s obvious you should go option a, yet so many retailers go with option b. At least the online businesses have the excuse that they can’t see the look of urgency and frustration in their customers’ eyes, it is impossible to fathom why so many bricks-and-mortar stores make the same mistake!

Commoditised relationships aren’t bad

Many people argue that Apple stores are close to best practice when it comes to retail, yet for most of the customer interaction the store staff member doesn’t know anything about the individual’s identity. It is not until the point of purchase that they actually access any purchase history. The lesson is that if the service is commoditised it is better to avoid cluttering the process with extraneous information.

Arguably the success of discount air travel has been the standardisation of the experience. Those who spend much of their lives emulating the movie Up in the Air want to be recognised. For the rest of the population, who just want to get to their destination at the lowest price possible while keeping a small amount of comfort and staying safe, a commoditised service is ideal. Given the product is not customised there is little need to know much about the individual customers. Aggregate data for demand forecasting can often be gained in more efficient ways including third party sources.

Do more with less

Online and in person, organisations are collecting more data than ever about their customers. Many of these organisations would do better to focus on a few items of data and build true relationships by understanding everything they can from these small number of key data elements. I’ve previously argued for the use of a magic 150 or “Dunbar’s number” (see The rule of 150 applied to data). If they did this, not only would they be more effective in their use of their data, they could also be more transparent about what data they collect and the purposes to which they put it.

People increasingly have a view of the value of their information and they often end-up resenting its misuse. Perhaps, the only thing worse than misusing it is not using it at all. There is so much information that is collected that then causes resentment when the customer doesn’t get the obvious benefit that should have been derived. Nothing frustrates people more than having to tell their providers things that are obvious from the information that they have already been asked for, such their interests, family relationships or location.

Organisations that don’t heed this will face a backlash as people seek to regain control of their own information (see You should own your own data).

Customers value simplicity

In this age of complexity, customers are often willing to trade convenience for simplicity. Many people are perfectly happy to be a guest at the sites they use infrequently, even though they have to re-enter their details each time, rather than having to remember yet another login. They like these relationships to be cheerfully transactional and want their service providers to respect them regardless.

The future is not just more data, it is more tailored data with less creepy insight and a greater focus on a few meaningful relationships.

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Category: Enterprise Data Management, Enterprise2.0, Information Development, Master Data Management
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by: Jonathan
09  Jul  2015

Are We Missing the Mark with Real-Time Marketing?

If any press is good press, then Totinos can chalk up its latest Super Bowl marketing antics for a win. However, it’s questionable whether the brand will gain any true business value from live-tweeting the game a day early. In fact, marketers should step back and consider whether our obsession with vanity metrics and viral campaigns is distracting us from the true potential of real-time and data-driven marketing.

 

Mainstream real-time marketing

 

In short, real-time marketing normally referred to as the practice of engaging audiences with content that is relevant to a specific current event. For most brands, this content often takes the shape of “memes” shared through social media channels.

 

While Totinos’ day-early tweets were revealed to be a gimmick, initially many thought the company had made a significant real-time gaffe. Pre-written tweets in an attempt to be clever reflect organizations’ desire to streamline their marketing using a pre-determined formula. Better brands understand that real-time marketing has to be organic with an understanding of the target-market. Oreo’s real-time tweet during the power outage of Super Bowl XLVII was held up as a genius example of real-time marketing. While brand engagement certainly has its place, true real-time marketing that has a long-term impact on ROI is much less sexy than a clever tweet in front of a large audience.

 

Where real-time marketing started

 

While many might associate real-time marketing with the rise of big data analytics and social media, the term rose to popularity well before social media marketing and data collection took off. In fact, the term first surfaced back in 2005. Back then it wasn’t about “memes” and on-the-spot tweets, but instead web personalization.

 

Initially, big brands wanted to find ways to personalize their website experiences in real-time. However, the technology and software weren’t at that level, and any solutions were often expensive and not all that great. This eventually led to customized email marketing approaches and other methods, while web personalization was put on the backburner. Fast forward to today, that element has all but expired with more effort being placed on social media.

 

Missing the mark and taking the easy road

 

This is precisely where most organizations are missing the mark. Sure, Oreo’s Super Bowl tweet was amazing and produced a tremendous amount of engagement, but as mentioned earlier, real-time marketing isn’t designed for engagement. It’s meant for finding ways to create substantial long-term impacts on ROI. But that’s hard, just as it was in 2005 with web personalization. People would rather take the easy way out and point to massive amounts of social impressions instead of using data and real-time analysis to produce more value in other areas. That needs to change.

 

Where can real-time marketing be implemented

 

There are a number of different marketing approaches that stand to benefit from a real-time approach. Here are just a few examples to get your creative juices flowing.

 

  1. Customized landing pages

 

What was difficult back in 2005 is becoming a lot easier today. E-commerce sites have made the most of this, by allowing users to create personal profiles, and then offering items based on searches in real-time. This may be more difficult for other sites, but not impossible. Creating personalized landing pages based on devices used or user preferences is becoming increasingly common. Real-time abilities allow programs to make these changes on the fly, reacting to clicks and searches almost instantly.

 

  1. Location-based marketing

 

Thanks to mobile technology, primarily smartphones, and their built-in location services, marketers have the ability to tailor messages based on area like never before. For example, if users are near Wal Mart or Target, promotions could be pushed to their devices via notifications. Marketers can also use the technology to see where users shop most often, or use in-store beacons to attract shoppers. By utilizing real-time capabilities, marketers can craft individualized offers and have them activated at the right moment, when users are likely to act.

 

  1. Multi-channel marketing

 

The path to making a purchase is becoming increasingly more complex. In times past, it simply involved a trip to the local store or maybe a catalogue. Today, it often includes visiting websites, browsing social media accounts, and viewing mobile sites. In order to meet the demands, brands are forced to customized approaches for each of their channels, allowing tailored marketing efforts for each channel, while still maintaining a seamless approach as users jump from one to the other. Real-time analytics can provide organizations with constant details about which channels they’re using, and what they’ll respond best to in order to increase conversion rates.

 

Category: Information Development
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by: Bsomich
28  Jun  2015

MIKE2.0 Community Update

Interested in better data management? See what’s been happening in the MIKE2.0 community this month:

 

  
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Have you seen our Open MIKE Series? 

The Open MIKE Podcast is a video podcast show which discusses aspects of the MIKE2.0 framework, and features content contributed to MIKE 2.0 Wiki Articles, Blog Posts, and Discussion Forums.

You can scroll through the Open MIKE Podcast episodes below:

For more information on MIKE2.0 or how to get involved with our online community, please visit www.openmethodology.org.

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community  

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This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

Key Considerations for a Big Data StrategyMost companies by now understand the inherent value found in big data. With more information at their fingertips, they can make better decisions regarding their businesses. That’s what makes the collection and analysis of big data so important today. Any company that doesn’t see the advantages that big data brings may quickly find themselves falling behind their competitors.

Read more.

The Internet was a mistake. Now let’s fix it. 

Each generation over the last century has seen new technologies that become so embedded in their lives that its absence would be unimaginable.  Early in the 20th century it was radio, which quickly become the entertainment of choice, then television, video and over the past two decades it has been the Internet. For the generation who straddles the implementation of each, there have been format and governance debates which are quickly forgotten.  Today, few remember the colour television format choice every country made between NTSC and PAL just as anyone who bought a video recorder in the early 1980s had to choose between VHS and Beta.

Read more.

Flash Quiety Taking Over Disk in a Big Data World

Right now, we live in the big data era. What was once looked at as a future trend is now very much our present reality. Businesses and organizations of all shapes and sizes have embraced big data as a way to improve their operations and find solutions to longstanding problems. It’s almost impossible to overstate just how much big data has impacted the world in such a short amount of time, affecting everyone’s life whether we truly comprehend how.

Read more.

Forward to a Friend!Know someone who might be interested in joining the Mike2.0 Community? Forward this message to a friend

Questions?

If you have any questions, please email us at mike2@openmethodology.org

 

 

Category: Information Development
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by: Bsomich
18  May  2015

MIKE2.0 Community Update

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Missed what’s been happening in the MIKE2.0 data management community? Check out our latest update:

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How Do You Define Your Master Data? 

There are numerous definitions for “master data” ranging from one sentence to a few paragraphs.  This is perhaps the most straightforward one I’ve come across:

Master data is the core data that is essential to operations in a specific business or business unit. - via Whatis.com

A clear and simple definition, yet a lot of companies often struggle to adhere to it when identifying and qualifying master data for their organizations.

Why do you think this is?

Although data is often looked at on a transactional basis, master data typically makes up a large a percentage of the data elements in any given transaction. Common examples of master data include:

  • Customer data (name, contact details, DOB, customer classification)
  • Locality data (physical address, postal address, geographical data)
  • Product data (item number, bill of materials, product codes)
  • Employee data (employee number, role, placement in organisational structure)
  • Partner data (partner name, classification)

It is not unusual for this same data to be held in dozens or even hundreds of applications across a large organization, and may be difficult to isolate and collect.   Much of the data has been held in legacy systems for years and may be held in a fashion where data is poorly integrated and at low levels of quality.  Many organizations have poorly implemented Data Governance processes to handle changes in this data over time.

MIKE2.0 offers an open source solution for managing master data that outlines many of the issues organizations have with identifying it.

We hope you find this offering of benefit and welcome any suggestions you may have to improve it.

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community

Popular Content

Did you know that the following wiki articles are most popular on Google? Check them out, and feel free to edit or expand them!

What is MIKE2.0?
Deliverable Templates
The 5 Phases of MIKE2.0
Overall Task List
Business Assessment Blueprint
SAFE Architecture
Information Governance Solution

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This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

5 Unusual Ways Businesses are Using Big Data

Big data is where it’s at. At least, that’s what we’ve been told. So it should come as no surprise that businesses are busy imagining ways they can take advantage of big data analytics to grow their companies. Many of these uses are fairly well documented, like improving marketing efforts, or gaining a better understanding of their customers, or even figuring out better ways to detect and prevent fraud. The most common big data use cases have become an important part of industries the world over, but big data can be used for much more than that. In fact, many companies out there have come up with creative and unusual uses for big data analytics, showing just how versatile and helpful big data can be.

Read more.

Cloud Computing and the Industries that Love It

Cloud computing provides greater security, virtually unlimited computing resources for research and development, cost savings, and advanced threat detection methods. With so many reasons to use cloud computing, it’s no wonder many industries have flocked to the new technology. Cloud technology serves as a form of outsourcing for companies, where some data is kept in house for better control, and other data is trusted to a third-party provider. Each industry that benefits from cloud computing has their own specific reasons for adopting the technology, but cloud computing is most profitable for companies that work with emerging markets and need quick and cost effective scalability.

Read more.
Is Your Data Quality Boring? 

Let’s be honest here. Data Quality is good and worthy, but it can be a pretty dull affair at times. Information Management is something that “just happens”, and folks would rather not know the ins-and-outs of how the monthly Management Pack gets created. Yet I’ll bet that they’ll be right on your case when the numbers are “wrong.” Right?

So here’s an idea. The next time you want to engage someone in a discussion about data quality, don’t start by discussing data quality. Don’t mention the processes of profiling, validating or cleansing data. Don’t talk about integration, storage or reporting. And don’t even think about metadata, lineage or auditability.

Read more.

Forward this message to a friendQuestions?

If you have any questions, please email us at mike2@openmethodology.org. 

 

Category: Information Development
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by: Bsomich
12  May  2015

Defining Master Data

There are numerous definitions for “master data” ranging from one sentence to a few paragraphs.  This is perhaps the most straightforward one I’ve come across:

Master data is the core data that is essential to operations in a specific business or business unit. - via Whatis.com

A clear and simple definition, yet a lot of companies often struggle to adhere to it when identifying and qualifying master data for their organizations.

Why do you think this is?

Although data is often looked at on a transactional basis, master data typically makes up a large a percentage of the data elements in any given transaction. Common examples of master data include:

  • Customer data (name, contact details, DOB, customer classification)
  • Locality data (physical address, postal address, geographical data)
  • Product data (item number, bill of materials, product codes)
  • Employee data (employee number, role, placement in organisational structure)
  • Partner data (partner name, classification)

It is not unusual for this same data to be held in dozens or even hundreds of applications across a large organization, and may be difficult to isolate and collect.   Much of the data has been held in legacy systems for years and may be held in a fashion where data is poorly integrated and at low levels of quality.  Many organizations have poorly implemented Data Governance processes to handle changes in this data over time.

MIKE2.0 offers an open source solution for managing master data that outlines many of the issues organizations have with identifying it.

How do you define and qualify your master data?

Category: Information Development
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by: Bsomich
10  Apr  2015

MIKE2.0 Community Update

Missed what’s been happening in the MIKE2.0 data management community? Read on:

  
 logo.jpg

Community Announcement: MIKE2.0 and DAMA-International

This month, the MIKE2.0 Governance Association (MGA) is pleased to announce an agreement with DAMA-International commencing the transition of the MIKE2.0 community to DAMA-International. The agreement was announced last week at the DAMA-I Chapter Meeting at Enterprise Data World 2015 (EDW 15) in Washington, DC.

Under the transition, the MIKE2.0 community will now be provided by the existing DAMA-I Chapter structure and related member services and activities for the continued development and extension of the MIKE2.0 framework. “We at DAMA-I are delighted and honored to have the opportunity to progress and build upon the combined wisdom within MIKE2.0 and DAMA DMBOK. Merging practical with theoretical provides the ultimate approach to managing data,” said Sue Geuens, President of DAMA International, in a recent interview at Enterprise Data World.

After nearly a decade of community operations, the MIKE2.0 Governance Association is looking forward to the start of a new chapter under DAMA.  By solidifying this relationship, MGA is able to guarantee that all registered users and contributors to the MIKE2.0 project will continue to have an active community within which they can continue their professional networking, skills development, and intellectual contributions while utilizing and building the MIKE2.0 framework for information management.

“We are excited to reach an agreement with DAMA to solidify a sustainable future for MIKE2.0,” said Brenda Somich, community manager for MIKE2.0. “After years of dedication to this initiative, our team is grateful to know that the community will continue to expand and grow. As with the constant change and evolutionary nature of information, we are happy to announce that MIKE2.0 will also evolve.”

For any inquiries about MIKE2.0 and the acquisition by DAMA, please contact Rob Hillard, MGA board member and co-founder of MIKE2.0.

Sincerely,MIKE2.0 Community

Contribute to MIKE:

Start a new article, help with articles under construction or look for other ways to contribute

Update your personal profile to advertise yourself to the community and interact with other members.

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This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

5 Challenges Facing the Internet of Things 

Our constant need to be connected has expanded beyond smartphones and tablets into a wider network of interconnected objects. These objects, often referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT), have the ability to communicate with other devices and are constantly connected to the internet in order to record, store and exchange data. This idea of an “always on, always connected” device does seem a little big brother-ish, but there are definitely some benefits that come with it.

Read more.

The Change You Can’t See: What’s Your Horse Carcass?

I had the pleasure this month of launching the Australian edition of Deloitte’s Tech Tends 2015 report.  For a number of years now, we’ve put our necks on the line to predict what will happen in the immediate, and slightly longer, term.  Looking back over recent years, we can see the rise of cloud, the reinvention of the role of core IT systems and the evolution of management of technology in business.Read more.
The Debate Continues: The Future Impact of Net Neutrality on the Cloud

The debate over Net Neutrality is far from over. While the recent ruling by the FCC to classify broadband internet as a public utility may have changed the argument, debates will undoubtedly still continue to take place. The effects the decision has on the web will likely not be felt, let alone understood, for many years to come, but that hasn’t stopped speculation over what a neutral internet will actually look like and how companies and internet service providers (ISPs) will be impacted.

Read more.

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Category: Information Development
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by: Bsomich
01  Apr  2015

Community Announcement: MIKE2.0 and DAMA-International

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
MIKE2.0 Governance Association
Pfingstweidstrasse 60, CH-8050
Zürich, Switzerland

March 31, 2015 – Zürich, Switzerland - This week, the MIKE2.0 Governance Association (MGA) is pleased to announce an agreement with DAMA-International commencing the transition of the MIKE2.0 community to DAMA-International. The agreement was announced on Monday evening at the DAMA-I Chapter Meeting at Enterprise Data World 2015 (EDW 15) in Washington, DC.

Under the transition, the MIKE2.0 community will now be provided by the existing DAMA-I Chapter structure and related member services and activities for the continued development and extension of the MIKE2.0 framework. “We at DAMA-I are delighted and honored to have the opportunity to progress and build upon the combined wisdom within MIKE2.0 and DAMA DMBOK. Merging practical with theoretical provides the ultimate approach to managing data,” said Sue Geuens, President of DAMA International, in a recent interview at Enterprise Data World.

 About MIKE2.0

With 869 articles and 29,675 members contributing their knowledge and experience, Method for an Integrated Knowledge Environment (MIKE2.0) is an online community providing a comprehensive methodology that can be applied across a number of different projects within the Information Management space. It was released under open source in 2006 although earlier efforts of the project date back to 2003. The MIKE2.0 Governance Association (MGA) has been the governing body since 2009. In 2013, the MGA team authored Information Development using MIKE2.0, translating many of the community’s core content assets to print to better reach an offline audience.

After nearly a decade of community operations, the MIKE2.0 Governance Association is looking forward to the start of a new chapter under DAMA.  By solidifying this relationship, MGA is able to guarantee that all registered users and contributors to the MIKE2.0 project will continue to have an active community within which they can continue their professional networking, skills development, and intellectual contributions while utilizing and building the MIKE2.0 framework for information management.

“We are excited to reach an agreement with DAMA to solidify a sustainable future for MIKE2.0,” said Brenda Somich, community manager for MIKE2.0. “After years of dedication to this initiative, our team is grateful to know that the community will continue to expand and grow. As with the constant change and evolutionary nature of information, we are happy to announce that MIKE2.0 will also evolve.”

For any inquiries about MIKE2.0 and the acquisition by DAMA, please contact Rob Hillard, MGA board member and co-founder of MIKE2.0.

Category: Information Development
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by: Bsomich
19  Mar  2015

MIKE2.0 Community Update

Missed what’s been happening in the MIKE2.0 data management community? Read on:

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The Transformation to a Data-Driven Business: Join us at EDW15!

Attending Enterprise Data World in DC later this month? We look forward to seeing you!

The Enterprise Data World (EDW) Conference is recognized as the most comprehensive educational conference on data management in the world.

What to Expect at EDW 2015:

  • Enterprise Data Strategy
  • Data Governance Program Implementation
  • Building for New Demands of Data Architecture
  • Data Quality Measurements and Scorecarding
  • Big Data Trends and Technologies
  • Rolling out Master Data Management
  • EIM – Transforming into Data-driven Business
  • Real-time Analytics & Business Intelligence
  • Best Practices in all aspects of Enterprise Data Management
  • Agile Data Methods

Most importantly, you’ll hear from DAMA and the MGA team about some exciting new developments planned for the MIKE2.0 community this year.

We hope to see you there!

Not registered yet? Visit http://edw2015.dataversity.net or contact us for details.

Sincerely,MIKE2.0 Community

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This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

Cloud Services: Open vs Proprietary  

There’s nothing more punk-rock than the sort of DIY ethics currently fueling open-source communities. The general subversiveness combined with an apparent twice-a-week minimum black t-shirt rule among developers may make the open source scene look kind of like a cool-guy/girl clique, at least from an outsider’s perspective.

Everybody is rebelling against something, right?

Read more.

5 Ways Big Data is Changing the World of Design

Back in the analog days, designers used hands-on tools to bring their creations to light. But in this day and age of information and advanced technology big data and analytics tools are transforming the world of design as never before.In a November 2014 article on wired.com Paul Papas, “the Global Leader for the IBM’s Interactive Experience practice, a next-generation digital agency, consultancy, and systems integrator,” discusses the revolutionizing power of big data in all facets and fields of design. Compiled from the author’s views and insights is this list of 5 ways big data is transforming the world of design.

Read more. 

Making the Case for Jargon, Acronyms and Clear Language

All over the web, authors are ranting about the misuse of the English language in business.  It’s an easy article to write, picking out examples of jargon and the general torturing of sentences in the name of explaining apparently simple concepts while making the writer seem more impressive.

Some great examples from business can be found in this Forbes article: The Most Annoying, Pretentious and Useless Business Jargon.  Examples that I like (or hate) include terms like “swim lanes”, “best practice” and “core competence.”

Read more. 

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