Open Framework, Information Management Strategy & Collaborative Governance | Data & Social Methodology - MIKE2.0 Methodology
Members
Collapse Expand Close

To join, please contact us.

Improve MIKE 2.0
Collapse Expand Close
Need somewhere to start? How about the most wanted pages; or the pages we know need more work; or even the stub that somebody else has started, but hasn't been able to finish. Or create a ticket for any issues you have found.
by: Bsomich
14  Dec  2013

Weekly IM Update.

 logo.jpg

What is an Open Methodology Framework?

An Open Methodology Framework is a collaborative environment for building methods to solve complex issues impacting business, technology, and society.  The best methodologies provide repeatable approaches on how to do things well based on established techniques. MIKE2.0′s Open Methodology Framework goes beyond the standards, techniques and best practices common to most methodologies with three objectives:

  • To Encourage Collaborative User Engagement
  • To Provide a Framework for Innovation
  • To Balance Release Stability with Continuous Improvement

We believe that this approach provides a successful framework accomplishing things in a better and collaborative fashion. What’s more, this approach allows for concurrent focus on both method and detailed technology artifacts. The emphasis is on emerging areas in which current methods and technologies lack maturity.

The Open Methodology Framework will be extended over time to include other projects. Another example of an open methodology, is open-sustainability which applies many of these concepts to the area of sustainable development. Suggestions for other Open Methodology projects can be initiated on this article’s talk page.

We hope you find this of benefit and welcome any suggestions you may have to improve it.

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community

Popular Content

Did you know that the following wiki articles are most popular on Google? Check them out, and feel free to edit or expand them!

What is MIKE2.0?
Deliverable Templates
The 5 Phases of MIKE2.0
Overall Task List
Business Assessment Blueprint
SAFE Architecture
Information Governance Solution

Contribute to MIKE:

Start a new article, help with articles under construction or look for other ways to contribute.

Update your personal profile to advertise yourself to the community and interact with other members.

Useful Links:
Home Page
Login
Content Model
FAQs
MIKE2.0 Governance

Join Us on
42.gif

Follow Us on
43 copy.jpg

Join Us on
images.jpg

 

This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

The Sound of Sound Information Security
I like it when I stumble across examples of information management concepts.  While working on a podcast interview with William McKnight discussing his new book Information Management: Strategies for Gaining a Competitive Advantage with Data, I asked William for a song recommendation to play as background music while I read his bio during the opening segment of the podcast.

After William emailed me an Apple iTunes audio file for the song “Mother North” off of the 1996 album Nemesis Divina by Norwegian black metal band Satyricon, as the following screen capture shows, I ran into an issue when I attempted to play the song on my computer.

Read more.

In Defense of Structured Data

Writing a book is always a rewarding and challenging endeavor. Ask any author. As I pen these words, I am going through the final edits on The Visual Organization. As someone who recognizes that plenty of great work has already been done in the area of data visualization, I dutifully cite a slew of sources.

It’s just smart to recognize the previous contributions of others in any field, especially the influential ones. What’s more, attribution and intellectual property are fundamental to the world of publishing. And I certainly like receiving credit for things I have written and said. I get a little miffed when I don’t.

Read more.

The Gordian Knot of Big Data Integration

According to legend, the Gordian Knot was an intricate knot binding the ox-cart of the peasant-turned-king Gordias of Phrygia (located in the Balkan Peninsula of Southeast Europe) to a pole within the temple of Zeus in Gordium.  It was prophesied that whoever loosed the knot would become ruler of all Asia.

In 333 BC, Alexander the Great sliced the knot in half with a stroke of his sword (the so-called “Alexandrian solution”) and that night there was a violent thunderstorm, which Alexander took as a sign that Zeus was pleased and would grant Alexander many victories.  He then proceeded to conquer Asia, and much of the then known world, apparently fulfilling the prophecy.

Read more.

 

Forward to a Friend!

Know someone who might be interested in joining the Mike2.0 Community? Forward this message to a friendQuestions?

If you have any questions, please email us at mike2@openmethodology.org.

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Ocdqblog
10  Dec  2013

The Sound of Sound Information Security

I like it when I stumble across examples of information management concepts.  While working on a podcast interview with William McKnight discussing his new book Information Management: Strategies for Gaining a Competitive Advantage with Data, I asked William for a song recommendation to play as background music while I read his bio during the opening segment of the podcast.

After William emailed me an Apple iTunes audio file for the song “Mother North” off of the 1996 album Nemesis Divina by Norwegian black metal band Satyricon, as the following screen capture shows, I ran into an issue when I attempted to play the song on my computer:

This example provides two points about the information security aspects of information governance:

  • The need to establish a way to enforce information security so that only authorized users can access protected information.  In this case, the protected information is a song purchased from the Apple iTunes store, where purchases are associated with both an Apple ID and the computer used to purchase it.  This establishes an information security policy that is automatically enforced whenever the information is accessed.  If a security violation is detected, in this case by attempting to play the song on another computer, the policy prevents the unauthorized access.
  • Information security policies also have to allow for unexpected, but allowable, exceptions otherwise security becomes too restrictive and inconveniences the user.  In this case, Apple iTunes allows a song to be played on up to 5 computers associated with the Apple ID used to purchase it.  This is an excellent example of the need to combine portability and security by embedding a security policy as the information’s travel companion.  Apple does not just prevent you from playing the song, but offers the ability to prove you are authorized to play it on another computer by entering your Apple ID and password.

The goal of information security is to protect information assets against intrusion or inappropriate access.  Comprehensive security must not be limited to the system of origination but must travel with the information, especially as today’s mobile users need to access information from multiple devices.

Much like the hills are alive with the sound of music, make sure that your information governance policies are alive with the sound of sound information security, thus making your organization’s easily accessible while appropriately protected information assets music to your users’ ears.

Category: Information Governance
2 Comments »

by: Phil Simon
09  Dec  2013

In Defense of Structured Data

Writing a book is always a rewarding and challenging endeavor. Ask any author. As I pen these words, I am going through the final edits on The Visual Organization. As someone who recognizes that plenty of great work has already been done in the area of data visualization, I dutifully cite a slew of sources.

It’s just smart to recognize the previous contributions of others in any field, especially the influential ones. What’s more, attribution and intellectual property are fundamental to the world of publishing. And I certainly like receiving credit for things I have written and said. I get a little miffed when I don’t.

While this is often a bit of an administrative burden on the author, I get it. This means that I have to ask for and receive permissions from media sites, bloggers, and individuals if I want to use more than a certain number of their words.

Better Data Collection Mechanisms

Still, there’s a way to collect and track this information that makes it less onerous for all involved. No, we don’t have to build a sophisticated database, but simple spreadsheets are far superior for this type of rudimentary data management. (And, make no mistake, that’s exactly what this exercise invovles.)

Lamentably, though, not everyone sees it this way. For instance, the data-challenged wizards at FastCompany had me follow an inefficient and borderline excruciating “process” of writing several e-mails to several different companies. This included a series of questions collected in a free-response format. A web-based survey would have better for all concerned. Responding to individual e-mails doesn’t lend itself to easy and comprehensive analysis.

At the end of the e-mail chain, someone new sent me what appeared to be an arbitrary number on what I’d have to pay to use 87 words from an article of theirs. That price was in my view excessive and capricious, underscored by the nature the process.

Simon Says: Structure What You Can

You’ll get no argument from me on the importance of unstructured data. Still, structured data remains exceptionally valuable. There’s just no excuse for treating everything as unstructured.

The smartest folks and organizations out there are breaking from old habits and recognizing that one size doesn’t necessarily fit all. Creating structure where it makes sense saves a great deal of time and allows others to see things that others miss. As Henry David Thoreau once said, “It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.”

Feedback

What say you?

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
07  Dec  2013

Weekly IM Update.

 
 logo.jpg

Business Drivers for Better Metadata Management

There are a number Business Drivers for Better Metadata Management that have caused metadata management to grow in importance over the past few years at most major organisations. These organisations are focused on more than just a data dictionary across their information – they are building comprehensive solutions for managing business and technical metadata.Our wiki article on the subject explores many factors contributing to the growth of metadata and guidance to better manage it:  

Feel free to check it out when you have a moment.

Sincerely,MIKE2.0 Community

Contribute to MIKE:

Start a new article, help with articles under construction or look for other ways to contribute.

Update your personal profile to advertise yourself to the community and interact with other members.

Useful Links: Home Page Login Content Model FAQs MIKE2.0 Governance

Join Us on
42.gif

Follow Us on 43 copy.jpg

Join Us on
images.jpg

Did You Know? All content on MIKE2.0 and any contributions you make are published under the Creative Commons license. This allows you free re-use of our content as long as you add a brief reference back to us.

 

This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

Twitter: Rubbish, Valuable, or Both?

We reach a certain age and the music gets too loud. We believe that the world is going to hell in a hand basket. Things were just better when we were young.

This is always the case, and today is no exception. The complaints can be deafening. Young people don’t read books anymore. Look at what young folks are wearing. We decry the state of society and the future.

Of course, we’ve seen this movie before; every generation does this. Many people my age and older dismiss Twitter and the very idea tweeting. Somehow, reading books and newspapers were more sophisticated than texting, tweeting, blogging, and friending.

Read more.

The Data of Damocles

While the era of Big Data invokes concerns about privacy and surveillance, we still tender our privacy as currency for Internet/mobile-based services as the geo-location tags, date-time stamps, and other information associated with our phone calls, text messages, emails, and social networking status updates become the bits and bytes of digital bread crumbs we scatter along our daily paths as our self-surveillance avails companies and governments with the data needed to track us, target us with personalized advertising, and terrorize us with the thought of always being watched.Read more.

Evernote’s Three Laws of Data Protection

“It’s all about bucks, kid. The rest is conversation.” –Michael Douglass as Gordon Gekko, Wall Street (1987) Sporting more than 60 million users, Evernote is one of the most popular productivity apps out there these days. You may in fact use the app to store audio notes, video, pics, websites, and perform a whole host of other tasks. Read more.

  Forward this message to a friend

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

by: Phil Simon
01  Dec  2013

Twitter: Rubbish, Valuable, or Both?

We reach a certain age and the music gets too loud. We believe that the world is going to hell in a hand basket. Things were just better when we were young.

This is always the case, and today is no exception. The complaints can be deafening. Young people don’t read books anymore. Look at what young folks are wearing. We decry the state of society and the future.

Of course, we’ve seen this movie before; every generation does this. Many people my age and older dismiss Twitter and the very idea tweeting. Somehow, reading books and newspapers were more sophisticated than texting, tweeting, blogging, and friending.

The Remarkable Data Behind 140 Characters

That may be true on some abstract cultural level. Curmudgeon Andrew Keen would wholeheartedly agree with that premise. On a data or technological level, though, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, the data technology behind 140 characters are nothing short of remarkable. The BusinessWeek story The Hidden Technology That Makes Twitter Huge details the data and metadata behind each tweet.

From the piece:

All tweets share the same anatomy. To examine the guts of a tweet, you request an “API key” from Twitter, which is a fast, automated procedure. You then visit special Web addresses that, instead of nicely formatted Web pages for humans to read, return raw data for computers to read. That data is expressed in a computer language—a smushed-up nest of brackets and characters. It’s a simplified version of JavaScript called JSON, which stands for JavaScript Object Notation. API essentially means “speaks (and reads) JSON.” The language comes in a bundle of name/value fields, 31 of which make up a tweet. For example, if a tweet has been “favorited” 25 times, the corresponding name is “favorite_count” and “25” is the value.

Think about it: 31 data fields captured for each tweet. I’d bet my house that that number will only rise in the coming years. Types of data that we can’t even imagine will one day be tracked, analyzed, and used in unfathomable ways.

The notion of 140 characters may seem inherently limiting. What can you really know from such a small amount of text?  The answer depends, but surely a great deal more can be gleaned from a tweet’s metadata. Think about things like a tweet’s location, user, device, date, time, URL, and the like. All of a sudden, tweets can become more informative, contextual, and maybe even predictive.

Simon Says: Learn from Twitter

The lesson here is two-fold. First, recognize that you can’t predict the future. As I’ve said myriad times in my career, its better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it. With data storage costs plummeting, why not track every type of data you can?

Second, ensure that your organization’s  infrastructure can support new data types, emerging sources, and increased volumes. Yes, ETL is still important, but the future is all about APIs. Make sure that your organization is keeping up with the times. The costs of inaction are irrelevance and possibly extinction.

Feedback

What say you?

Category: Information Value
No Comments »

by: Ocdqblog
27  Nov  2013

The Data of Damocles

While the era of Big Data invokes concerns about privacy and surveillance, we still tender our privacy as currency for Internet/mobile-based services as the geo-location tags, date-time stamps, and other information associated with our phone calls, text messages, emails, and social networking status updates become the bits and bytes of digital bread crumbs we scatter along our daily paths as our self-surveillance avails companies and governments with the data needed to track us, target us with personalized advertising, and terrorize us with the thought of always being watched.

Even though it creeps us out when we stop to think about it, we’ve become so accustomed to this new digital normal that it’d be more difficult than we may realize to stop.  Robert Hillard recently blogged about his failed attempt to live for one day without creating big data.  “Nowhere is the right to anonymity enshrined in the digital age,” Hillard concluded.  “The reality is that we leave a big data trail whether we like it or not.  While the vast majority of that data is never used, we are not in control.”

In their book Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think, Viktor Mayer-Schonberger and Kenneth Cukier pondered “the specter of permanent memory” the data we create but aren’t in control of conjures as “risk that one can never escape one’s past because the digital records can always be dredged up.  Our personal data hovers over us like the Sword of Damocles threatening to impale us years hence with some private detail or regrettable purchase.”

The Sword of Damocles hung above his head by a wire-thin horsehair.  The Data of Damocles hangs over our heads by a wire-less web of cloud-enabled mobile services that hovers above us wheresoever we go and which could come crashing down upon us without warning.

“For decades an essential principle of privacy laws around the world,” Mayer-Schonberger and Cukier explained, “has been to put individuals in control by letting them decide whether, how, and by whom their personal information may be processed.  In the Internet age, this laudable ideal has often morphed into a formulaic system of notice and consent.  In the era of big data, however, when much of data’s value is in secondary uses that may have been unimagined when the data was collected, such a mechanism to ensure privacy is no longer suitable.”

They discussed a regulatory shift from privacy by consent to privacy through accountability, focusing less on individual consent at the time of data collection and more on holding data users accountable for what they do with that data.  They also discussed some technical innovations that can help protect privacy in certain instances, such as the concept of differential privacy, which deliberately blurs the data so that a query of a large dataset doesn’t reveal exact results but only approximate ones, thereby making it difficult to associate particular data points with particular people.

“In many fields, from nuclear technology to bioengineering,” Mayer-Schonberger and Cukier concluded, “we first build tools that we discover can harm us and only later set out to devise the safety mechanisms to protect us from those new tools.  In this regard, big data takes its place alongside other areas of society that present challenges with no absolute solutions, just ongoing questions about how we order our world.  Just as the printing press led to changes in the way society governs itself, so too does big data.  It forces us to confront new challenges with new solutions.  To ensure that people are protected at the same time as the technology is promoted, we must not let big data develop beyond the reach of human ability to shape the technology.”

Category: Information Governance
No Comments »

by: Robert.hillard
23  Nov  2013

Living without a trace of Big Data

I’ve watched over a number of months as major digital providers across handsets, telecommunications, internet services and virtually every other integrated offering have one by one described how they provide information to various governments.

While none of this should be a concern to me as long as I’m doing nothing wrong, I’m left troubled by the vision I painted just ahead of Snowden’s PRISM leak of a world that was as intrusive as that which Orwell painted in his chilling 1984 (Living as far from 1984 as Orwell).

So, I set myself a challenge: could I live for one day leaving a data footprint as light as that of a citizen of the real 1984?

6am. The last thing I did before going to bed was to dig out an ancient alarm clock to replace my smartphone that I typically wake-up to.  I know that my phone virtually lives in the cloud and almost everything it does leaves a trail.  To be sure that I silenced the digital hum of that part of my life, I powered it completely down.

6.30am. Clearly I haven’t prepared well enough, on the way to the station, I realised that the smartcard I use for the train is registered in my name.  Our train system does let you buy a smartcard without identifying yourself (as long as you use cash and don’t top it up online) so I had to allow some extra time.  It’s a good thing I’m not driving given that I would have had to have taken the back streets to avoid using the electronic tag our toll roads use.

7am. On the train, I notice how my fellow commuters are almost all engaged with their smart devices.  I probably should have bought a newspaper, something I haven’t needed on a train for years.

7.30am. I grab my usual coffee and breakfast, I hesitate before handing over my loyalty card (a paper relic), increasingly my preferred cafe will join many others and move their coffee scheme onto one of the mobile apps.

8am. I decide that using my building security pass is OK.  I’m making the rules up as I go, but justify using the pass on the basis that the data belongs to my employer and is no different to the time sheets I’m sure my 1984 predecessor would have filled out.

8.10am. I start-up my laptop and email.  I’m conscious that I’m leaving a trail within the office network, but I think I’m OK with my self-imposed rules but I’m definitely pushing the boundaries!

8.25am. A bit harder now, I’ve just noticed an email from a client that requires a response.  My 1984 rule definitely won’t let me send an email over the public internet so I revert to making a phone call.  Having said that, the personal touch is appreciated but took a bit longer.

9am. I’m in trouble now with my rules, I’ve just realised that I’ve left my mobile voicemail on without diverting it to my office. I wonder if this is a fail and what could someone tell electronically through my voicemail usage that they didn’t know in 1984?  The phone hacking scandal that engulfed the media in the UK comes immediately to mind.

9.30am. I head off to speak at a conference and have to take an extra moment to get someone to give me directions – I can’t use maps either from my PC or smartphone without leaving a trail.  A number of delegates have been tweeting and I think about whether I have to ask them not to.  Admittedly, in 1984 it would have been a matter of public record that I was speaking, but probably less easily brought together for anyone prying into my movements.

11.30am. I go to read a document by saving the PDF to my Dropbox account and give myself a quick mental slap on the wrist.  Using Dropbox leaves a digital trail.  Worse, I now need to do some HR performance reviews, but I realised that these products are cloud hosted and hence leave a trail across the Internet.

Lunch. I’ve gotten into the habit of walking for 10 minutes listening to music over my streaming service or calling my wife while I go to get lunch.  Neither is allowed today as both would leave a dense trail of digital crumbs!

Rather than walk, I decide to have a quick bite in a local café with a colleague.  I realise that I have just a few dollars left in cash.  Clearly using an ATM wouldn’t be allowed, but I could stop by a bank branch just like my 1984 predecessor.

Apart from not having time (a common 2013 problem) to visit a bank branch, I also wonder whether today’s withdrawal leaves a much bigger digital trail than its 1984 equivalent even when done in person.  Instead I pay with my credit card using the argument that they existed in 1984 and the basic process was the same.  I’m left wondering whether the fact that the 1984 trail was paper-based is materially different to the electronic data I’ve left behind today.

2pm. Now I’ve stuffed-up.  I had thought that I was OK logging onto my office network, but I needed to have switched off all of the cloud services before they even started.  Looks like any prying eyes can work out that I was online – although my lack of activity might make the record sparse.

3pm. I have long-since given up my earlier attempt to avoid sending external email and have responded to client questions and the scheduling of appointments.  I conveniently self-justified using an argument based on my own advice on the use of email (Reclaim email as a business tool) but I’m probably on the wrong side of this argument as the email trail is richer than any paper memo or letter.

6pm. I’m heading home and stop by a supermarket to pick-up bread and milk, and almost instinctively hand-over my loyalty card before stopping myself dead in my tracks.  I get a very strange look from the checkout staff member as I ask for my card back before he scans it!

7pm. Paranoia is now really setting in. I’m trying to work out if our cable TV service can tell whether we are switched on and, if so, what we are watching.  I decide that as long as I disconnect the Ethernet cable then it’s probably OK.

10pm. Reading in bed, trouble is the book I’m reading is on my Kindle. Finally, lights-out and at least they had electricity in 1984, but no smart meters!

Conclusion

Ultimately I failed to live for a day without creating Big Data.  Jason Bourne I’m not going to be!  Even if I had managed it, the absence of a digital foot print is as telling as the presence of one.  If suspected of a crime, then a citizen going to all of the trouble of being invisible would immediately be a suspect (in fact, this has already happened).  Nowhere is the right to anonymity enshrined in the digital age.

The reality is that we leave a Big Data trail whether we like it or not.  While the vast majority of that data is never used, we are not in control.  I have previously argued that you should own your own data.

Perhaps the ultimate irony is that by publishing this post on the Internet, anyone wondering why I went “dark” for a day will be able to fill in all of the missing pieces.

Category: Information Governance, Information Strategy
No Comments »

by: Ocdqblog
20  Nov  2013

Our Privacy is Currency — and We are Giving It Away

In my post from this past summer Through a PRISM, Darkly, I blogged about how ours is a world still struggling to come to terms with having more aspects of our everyday lives, both personal and professional, captured as data.

We rarely consider the data privacy implications of our brave new data world, which prompted me to ask why we are so concerned about the government accessing data that in many instances we voluntarily gave to companies like Google, which provides free services (not counting the money we do pay for our mobile phone plans and to our Internet service providers) that are not really free because we pay for them with our privacy.

“Google has sucked millions of people into its web by delivering a feature-packed email service that comes only at the price of our privacy,” David Braue recently blogged.

“We must face the unavoidable reality that we have sold our souls for free email.  Think about it: We bleat and scream to the hills about the government’s invasions of our privacy, then turn around and mail our personal information using a service specifically designed to harvest that information.”

As the image to the right shows, “Google has positioned Gmail as a gateway drug to a world where everything runs according to Google.  Google wants to manage our photos, our social media, our email, our word-processing documents, our everyday tasks, even our general documents.”

“This is the brave new world of the Internet,” Braue argued, “where privacy is an historical footnote and we are tricked or simply bribed to give it up.  By and large, we are quite happy to do so.  We may not love the need to deliver our personal lives on a platter in exchange for a spam-free, easily-accessible and substantially awesome email experience — but we do so with a smile, over and over again.”

To Braue’s point, no one is forcing us to use Gmail.  Many, myself included, use it for the convenience of managing multiple email accounts across multiple mobile devices.

And Google is certainly not our only enemy combatant in what I have previously dubbed the Data Cold War.  However, when we trade convenience for privacy, we have to admit the inconvenient truth that Pogo taught us long ago: “We have met the enemy and he is us.”

We don’t give away those slips of paper in our wallets without realizing that’s a form of currency.  And we don’t give away the digital currency that is our credit card numbers (e.g., via Twitter, you could use a single tweet to post seven of your credit card numbers, with one space after each 16-digit number, and hashtag it with #MyCreditCardNumbers — but I will assume you would not).

However, we do give away countless bytes of our personal data in exchange for Internet/mobile-based services that we consider to be free because, unlike the companies providing those services, we do not count personally identifiable information as a form of currency.

The reality is our privacy is currency — and we are giving it away.

Category: Information Governance
No Comments »

by: Phil Simon
19  Nov  2013

Incentives, Data, and IT Projects

IT project failures continue to haunt us. Consider the recent BusinessWeek article on the Healthcare.gov. It’s a fascinating read, as it demonstrates that massive problems that plagued the project. In short, it was an unmitigated disaster. From the piece:

Put charitably, the rollout of healthcare.gov has been a mess. Millward Brown Digital, a consulting firm, reports that a mere 1 percent of the 3.7 million people who tried to register on the federal exchange in the first week actually managed to enroll. Even if the problems are fixed, the debacle makes clear that it’s time for the government to change the way it ships code—namely, by embracing the approach to software development that has revolutionized the technology industry.

You could write a book about the failure about a project so large, expensive (nearly $400 million, and important. Even as of this writing, site performance is terrible:

Understanding Incentives

I certainly don’t have any inside information about how the project was (mis)managed. I can’t imagine, however, that incentives were properly aligned. With more than 50 different tech vendors involved, it’s highly probable that most if not all parties behaved in their rational, economic self-interest. Think Freakonomics.

I am reminded of an ERP project on which I worked about five years ago. The CIO routinely ignored the advice of consultants that the system was nowhere near ready to go live. I found out near the end of my contentious assignment that the entire executive team was receiving massive bonuses based upon going live at the end of the year. This no doubt colored the CIO’s perception of show-stopping issues.

Think about it. When a $100,000 bonus is on the line, how can you not minimize the impact employee and vendor data issues? More to the point, how can one truly be objective when that type of carrot is at stake?

Simon Says

I like to think that I have my own moral compass and that, if given the chance, I put the needs of the many above the needs of the few, to paraphrase Aristotle. Silly is the organization, however, that ignores the impact of financial incentives on IT projects.

Structure your compensation based upon long-term organizational goals, not short-term ones. While no guarantee, you’ll increase the chances of successful IT projects.

Feedback

What say you?

Category: Information Governance, Information Management
No Comments »

by: Bsomich
16  Nov  2013

Weekly IM Update.

Missed what happened in the MIKE2.0 community this week? Here’s a great recap:
 
 logo.jpg

MIKE2.0 Wiki Topic Index

We’ve recently added a new topic index to make searching our wiki more user-friendly. This week we’re featuring the Overview and Key Concepts Section, which includes:

Concept Papers (2)
Implementation Guide (10)
Introduction to MIKE2.0 (20)
MIKE2 Activities (68)
Continous Improvement (6)
Strategic Mobilisation (1)
Information Development Phases (6)
Overview and Key Concepts (6)
Concept Papers (2)
Information Development Concepts (19)
Application Development (4)
Information Strategy, Architecture and Governance
Enterprise Information Assessment (3)
Enterprise Information Integration (1)
Enterprise Information Management Strategy (1)
IT Transformation (8)
Model Driven Architecture (1)
Networked Information Governance (3)
Services Oriented Architecture (14)
Regulatory Reporting (2)
Requirements Gathering (17)
Software Delivery Lifecycle (12)
Testing (9)
Infrastructure Development (16)
Introduction to MIKE2.0 (20)

We hope you’ll browse through when you have a moment! For more information on MIKE2.0 or how to get involved with the online MIKE2.0 community, please contact us.

Sincerely,

MIKE2.0 Community  

Contribute to MIKE:

Start a new article, help with articles under construction or look for other ways to contribute.

Update your personal profile to advertise yourself to the community and interact with other members.

Useful Links: Home Page Login Content Model FAQs MIKE2.0 Governance

Join Us on
42.gif

Follow Us on 43 copy.jpg

Join Us on
images.jpg

 

Did You Know? All content on MIKE2.0 and any contributions you make are published under the Creative Commons license. This allows you free re-use of our content as long as you add a brief reference back to us.

 

This Week’s Blogs for Thought:

Semantic Business Vocabularies and Rules

For many in the traditional applications development community, “semantics” sounds like a perfect candidate for a buzzword tossed at management in an effort to pry fresh funding for what may appear to be academic projects with not much discernible practical payback. Indeed when challenged for examples of “semantic applications” often one hears stumbling litanies about “Linked Open Data”, ubiquitous “URLs” and “statement triples”. Traditional database folks might then retort where’s the beef?

Read more.

We is Smaller Than the Sum of its Me Parts

In Why Does E=mc2? (And Why Should We Care?), Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw explained “the energy released in chemical reactions has been the primary source of power for our civilization since prehistoric times.  The amount of energy that can be liberated for a given amount of coal, oil, or hydrogen is at the most fundamental level determined by the strength of the electromagnetic force, since it’s this force that determines the strength of the bonds between atoms and molecules that are broken and reformed in chemical reactions.  However, there’s another force of nature that offers the potential to deliver vastly more energy for a given amount of fuel, simply because it’s much stronger.”

Read more.

VanRoekel is Obama’s CIO

I recently had the opportunity to hear Steven VanRoekel, the second person who’s ever occupied a position I am glad to hear about: Federal Chief Information Officer of the United States. His talk was about federal information technology and initiatives he’s now implementing for the White House Office of Management and Budget. Prior to OMB, VanRoekel’s career ran from Microsoft (speechwriter for Bill Gates) through the Federal Communications Commission. During his tenure at the FCC, VanRoekel has been credited with modernizing aging IT infrastructures, using open-source based, cloud powered platforms for both web and VOIP applications; plus launching a Twitter account (with more than 400,000 followers!); plus the first federal “developer” website, crowd-sourcing data for projects like the National Broadband Map; plus the first to accept public comment via social media.

Read more.

Category: Information Development
No Comments »

Calendar
Collapse Expand Close
TODAY: Wed, April 23, 2014
April2014
SMTWTFS
303112345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930123
Recent Comments
Collapse Expand Close